Where To Get Singapore’s Favorite Historical Cocktail: The Singapore Sling on gadling.com

Developed sometime before 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon, a bartender who worked at the Long Bar in the Raffles Hotel Singapore, the Singapore Sling is a historical cocktail that has made a revival over the past few years. The original recipe used only the best ingredients – gin, Cherry Heering, Bénédictine and fresh pineapple juice. While by the 1980s the quality of the drink had begun to suffer – for example, substituting soda water and bottled juice instead of the fresh variety – a reappearance of Cherry Heering and fresh ingredients has revived the cocktail favorite.

Want to know where to get a quality Singapore Sling on your next trip to Singapore? Try these top venues.

Raffles Hotel Singapore

This should be the first stop on your mission to find the perfect Singapore Sling, as this is where the drink was created over 100 years ago. Inside the hotel is the legendary Long Bar, the birthplace of the cocktail. For those who enjoy sipping their drink in a laid-back atmosphere, the two-story venue features Earthy decor inspired by the Malayan plantations of the 1920s.
Moreover, if you’d like to try a unique spin on the drink, modern day bartenders at the Long Bar have created six variations – Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter, Tropical and Courtyard. To pay homage to the Ngiam Tong Boon, however, each recipe contains at least one original ingredient. For instance, the Spring Sling contains Smirnoff Apple Vodka, Apple Sourz and fresh pineapple and orange juices, while the gin-based Courtyard Sling is made with Lychee Liqueur, fresh mango juice and ginger beer. To help guests remember their cocktail experience, Singapore Sling Glasses and Sling Shakers are available for purchase.

Fullerton Hotel, Singapore

At the historic Fullerton Hotel, Singapore (FHS), patrons can enjoy more than just your average Singapore Sling. At their onsite Post Bar, there is actually a Singapore Sling collection, featuring eight unique variants of the famous cocktail, including a Coconut Sling and a Lychee Sling. The trendy bar also features a private music room with contemporary and new world music. Moreover, guests can choose to enjoy their cocktails at the under-lit honey onyx bar tables or outside in the bar’s adjoining outdoor East Garden.

The Ritz-Carlton, Millenia Singapore

At The Ritz-Carlton, Millenia Singapore, patrons will be able to enjoy classic Singapore Sling’s in a lounge named after the famous American glass artist, Dale Chihuly. The recipe for their version of the Sinapore goes like this: 30 ml Gin
15 ml Cherry Brandy
15 ml Grenadine
10 ml Triple Sec
10 ml Benedictine Dom
90 ml Pineapple Juice
15 ml Lime Juice
A dash of Angostura Bitters
Sliced Starfruit, Watermelon and Rock Melon for garnish
“There are many variations of Singapore Sling as different bartenders tweak the cocktail’s components for the best result,” explains assistant beverage manager Karamjeet Singh. “Our Singapore Sling is completely made a la minute when orders are received. This freshness really allows the subtleties of different flavors come through, from the warmth of the cherry brandy to the sunshine that pineapple juice imbues on the palate. Our Singapore Sling is slightly less sweet and doesn’t contain club soda unlike most other establishment’s version

Cherry Heering Singapore Sling on gurubootcamp.com

By Kara Newman
Mon Mar 7, 2011 10:44am EST
(Reuters.com) – As one of a Four Tiger economies, Singapore sees a satisfactory share of parched business travellers.
Any visit traveller knows that there’s some-more to see (and imbibe) over what’s offering in a hotel room minibar. To perform clients, or for an tell during a day’s end, meaningful a best watering holes is de rigueur for perceptive business visitors. Here are Singapore’s tip booze tips.
The Singapore cocktail stage is described as risk-taking and splashy, fuelled by disposable income from tourists, business travellers and well-heeled locals. Hotels and restaurants are fervent to uncover off charming drinks done with internal pleasant fruit (mangosteen, lychee, immature papaya), mostly incorporating formidable salty, green or sharp flavours that might seem surprising to Western palates accustomed to straight-up honeyed cocktails.
The iconic Singapore watering hole stays a Long Bar (here) in a colonial-style Raffles Hotel, home of a equally barbarous Singapore Sling. Although a bar is reported to have mislaid some of a radiance given a days of Somerset Maugham and Rudyard Kipling, it stays a unaccompanied place to sip a Sling.
Be warned: a Sling is too honeyed for some. Mixologist Eben Freeman, who spent several years in Singapore building bar programmes for AvroKo properties, offers this advice: “Ask for your Sling to be hand-shaken, with only a lurch of grenadine.” The Long Bar pumps out thousands of a renouned splash any day, he says, and a other mixture in a Sling (pineapple juice, Benedictine, Cointreau and Cherry Heering) are copiousness honeyed on their own. After, all, if you’re formulation to bombard out US$20 for a drink, advises Freeman, we wish that splash done properly.
There’s most to booze in Singapore over a Sling. On a Fullerton Hotel’s belligerent floor, a neat Post Bar (here) (so named since a bar reveals a strange roof of a pre-Fullerton General Post Office) is another classic. “All a business throng goes there for Caipirinhas,” Freeman says.
Meanwhile, a breathtaking perspective from a New Asia bar (bit.ly/9Cf3kx), located on Level 71 of Swissôtel The Stamford, creates it a popular, corporate-chic end for breathtaking martini guzzling.
For travellers peaceful to go a small serve afield for well-made classical cocktails, Freeman also recommends a forest-meets-veranda bar Klee (+65 6479 6911) in a former fort compound, Rochester Park. And, “for a truly brave and wealthy,” a Tippling Club (www.tipplingclub.com), where barman-turned-chemist Matthew Bax of Der Raum in Australia mixes adult memorable science-inspired cocktails such as a Smokey Old Bastard, a blockade cocktail served with wisps of “orange smoke” trapped within a mason jar.
Raffles Singapore Sling, pleasantness of Eben Freeman
If a outing to Singapore isn’t on your transport itinerary, here’s how to make a classical splash during home. A Singapore Sling potion is a tall, footed glass, mostly with winding sides. A high Collins potion can also be used.
1/4 oz grenadine
1/2 oz Benedictine
1/2 oz. Cherry Heering
1/2 oz. orange juice
3/4 oz. Cointreau

Cherry Heering Singapore Sling on Reuters.com

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2011/03/07/uk-sling-them-back-in-singapore-idUKLNE72604H20110307

The Spirited Traveller: Sling them back in Singapore

Any frequent traveller knows that there’s more to see (and imbibe) beyond what’s offered in a hotel room minibar. To entertain clients, or for an unwind at the day’s end, knowing the best watering holes is de rigueur for discerning business visitors. Here are Singapore’s top tipple tips.
The Singapore cocktail scene is described as risk-taking and splashy, fuelled by disposable income from tourists, business travellers and well-heeled locals. Hotels and restaurants are eager to show off colourful drinks made with local tropical fruit (mangosteen, lychee, green papaya), often incorporating complex salty, sour or spicy flavours which may seem unusual to Western palates accustomed to straight-up sweet cocktails.
The iconic Singapore watering hole remains the Long Bar () in the colonial-style Raffles Hotel, home of the equally infamous Singapore Sling. Although the bar is reported to have lost some of its lustre since the days of Somerset Maugham and Rudyard Kipling, it remains the singular place to sip a Sling.
Be warned: the Sling is too sweet for some. Mixologist Eben Freeman, who spent several years in Singapore building bar programmes for AvroKo properties, offers this advice: “Ask for your Sling to be hand-shaken, with just a dash of grenadine.” The Long Bar pumps out thousands of the popular drink each day, he says, and the other ingredients in a Sling (pineapple juice, Benedictine, Cointreau and Cherry Heering) are plenty sweet on their own. After, all, if you’re planning to shell out US$20 for a drink, advises Freeman, you want that drink made properly.
There’s much to tipple in Singapore beyond the Sling. On the Fullerton Hotel’s ground floor, the sleek Post Bar () (so named because the bar reveals the original ceiling of the pre-Fullerton General Post Office) is another classic. “All the business crowd goes there for Caipirinhas,” Freeman says.
Meanwhile, the panoramic view from the New Asia bar (), located on Level 71 of Swissôtel The Stamford, makes it a popular, corporate-chic destination for panoramic martini guzzling.
For travellers willing to go a little further afield for well-made classic cocktails, Freeman also recommends the forest-meets-veranda bar Klee (+65 6479 6911) in the former barracks compound, Rochester Park. And, “for the truly adventurous and wealthy,” the Tippling Club (), where barman-turned-chemist Matthew Bax of Der Raum in Australia mixes up unforgettable science-inspired cocktails such as the Smokey Old Bastard, a whisky cocktail served with wisps of “orange smoke” trapped within a mason jar.
Raffles Singapore Sling, courtesy of Eben Freeman
If a trip to Singapore isn’t on your travel itinerary, here’s how to make the classic drink at home. A Singapore Sling glass is a tall, footed glass, often with curved sides. A tall Collins glass can also be used.
1/4 oz grenadine
1/2 oz Benedictine
1/2 oz. Cherry Heering
1/2 oz. lime juice
3/4 oz. Cointreau

Cherry Heering Singapore Sling on Reuters .com

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/03/07/uk-sling-them-back-in-singapore-idUSLNE72604H20110307

As one of the Four Tiger economies, Singapore sees its fair share of thirsty business travellers.
Any frequent traveller knows that there’s more to see (and imbibe) beyond what’s offered in a hotel room minibar. To entertain clients, or for an unwind at the day’s end, knowing the best watering holes is de rigueur for discerning business visitors. Here are Singapore’s top tipple tips.
The Singapore cocktail scene is described as risk-taking and splashy, fuelled by disposable income from tourists, business travellers and well-heeled locals. Hotels and restaurants are eager to show off colourful drinks made with local tropical fruit (mangosteen, lychee, green papaya), often incorporating complex salty, sour or spicy flavours which may seem unusual to Western palates accustomed to straight-up sweet cocktails.
The iconic Singapore watering hole remains the Long Bar () in the colonial-style Raffles Hotel, home of the equally infamous Singapore Sling. Although the bar is reported to have lost some of its lustre since the days of Somerset Maugham and Rudyard Kipling, it remains the singular place to sip a Sling.
Be warned: the Sling is too sweet for some. Mixologist Eben Freeman, who spent several years in Singapore building bar programmes for AvroKo properties, offers this advice: “Ask for your Sling to be hand-shaken, with just a dash of grenadine.” The Long Bar pumps out thousands of the popular drink each day, he says, and the other ingredients in a Sling (pineapple juice, Benedictine, Cointreau and Cherry Heering) are plenty sweet on their own. After, all, if you’re planning to shell out US$20 for a drink, advises Freeman, you want that drink made properly.
There’s much to tipple in Singapore beyond the Sling. On the Fullerton Hotel’s ground floor, the sleek Post Bar () (so named because the bar reveals the original ceiling of the pre-Fullerton General Post Office) is another classic. “All the business crowd goes there for Caipirinhas,” Freeman says.
Meanwhile, the panoramic view from the New Asia bar (), located on Level 71 of Swissôtel The Stamford, makes it a popular, corporate-chic destination for panoramic martini guzzling.
For travellers willing to go a little further afield for well-made classic cocktails, Freeman also recommends the forest-meets-veranda bar Klee (+65 6479 6911) in the former barracks compound, Rochester Park. And, “for the truly adventurous and wealthy,” the Tippling Club (), where barman-turned-chemist Matthew Bax of Der Raum in Australia mixes up unforgettable science-inspired cocktails such as the Smokey Old Bastard, a whisky cocktail served with wisps of “orange smoke” trapped within a mason jar.
Raffles Singapore Sling, courtesy of Eben Freeman
If a trip to Singapore isn’t on your travel itinerary, here’s how to make the classic drink at home. A Singapore Sling glass is a tall, footed glass, often with curved sides. A tall Collins glass can also be used.
1/4 oz grenadine
1/2 oz Benedictine
1/2 oz. Cherry Heering
1/2 oz. lime juice
3/4 oz. Cointreau

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