Joe Schofield & 1966- One of Heering´s 200 years

Words by: Maggie Beale

Modern history shows that art students often have an affinity for finding summer jobs in the hospitality industry – at entry level it’s pretty easy and you get to meet new people all the time. Usually it’s not a permanent career – but Joe Schofield has made it so.

One step at a time, Joe has gained experience under some of the most accomplished experts in the bartending world. Principally at some of London’s internationally renowned cocktail bars – including The Zetter Townhouse; and The American Bar (No. 2, The World’s 50 Best Bars 2016)and Beaufort Bar at The Savoy; and including stints in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia.

“When I was 16 I took a part-time job in a local pub which was 10 minutes away from my house,” Joe said recently, “Two years later when I went to university in Leeds to study contemporary art, I started working at cocktail bars there, and that’s when I fell in love with the cocktail world.”

His rapid climb up the regional bar ranks was assured when he placed in the top five of the Bombay Sapphire World’s Most Imaginative Bartender competition, Followed quickly by coming in as a Global Finalist at the Beefeater Mix London. And as well as being picked to judge at the Bacardi Legacy regional finals in the United Kingdom, Joe most recently took his place as an International Bartender of the Year top 10 contender in the Tales of the Cocktail’s 2017 Spirited Award – all in the span of four short years.

In 2016, Joe had moved from behind London’s legendary bar venue at The Savoy to Asia to join the Tippling Club in Singapore – a city where he had – like many before him – enjoyed his first drink of the Singapore Sling in The Long Bar at Raffles Hotel.

With 10 years of experience behind the bar, he is well equipped to take on the position of Head Bartender at Tippling Club and Group Bar Manager overseeing the bar programmes for Ding Dong, Open Door Policy and Open Farm Community.

Dedicated career moves or serendipity? Perhaps a magical combination of both!

“It’s a challenge, though one that I embrace, to develop bar programmes for various establishments. It’s important that they complement the distinctive cuisines offered and yet are strong enough to stand on their own,” Joe rightly avers.

Shortly after settling in, Joe introduced Tippling Club’s latest memory-triggering cocktail programme—the Sensorium Menu. Conceived together with Chef Ryan Clift, the bespoke menu delivers an olfactory drinking experience that trigger a number of carefully curated scents into rousing memories and emotions through 12 unique cocktails.

As Joe explains, “The menu and drinking experiences are definitely going to showcase the synergy we have between kitchen and bar, in terms of both flavour and technique. I think a drink should always tell a story and be representative of the venue. In the new menu, we have developed quite a few out of left-field garnishes with help from the kitchen. And some drinks will tell a story using conceptual ideas.”

Their menu has since won the plaudits of industry experts and bartending authorities alike, paving the way to a prestigious top 10 spot in the World’s Best Cocktail Menu category of the Tales of the Cocktail’s 2017 Spirited Awards.

“I believe that the current trend in the industry today is with more and more bartenders starting to look towards the kitchen for inspiration. It is a huge privilege being able to do this on a daily basis at Tippling Club. There’s always so much to learn from that side of the F&B world!”

Joe further explained how to increase staff knowledge and experience. “At Tippling Club we actively encourage all team members to spend more time learning from different departments and aspects of hospitality. Some of their options is to spend time in the kitchen as well as taking part in wine training and tastings with our sommeliers.”

Of course, all of this continuous research has gained attention, and since joining Tippling Club, Joe has been instrumental in racking up an impressive array of accolades for the bar. In 2017 the venue placed at No. 11 in Asia’s 50 Best Bars awards, brought home the title of Best International Restaurant Bar at the Tales of the Cocktail’s 2017 Spirited Awards as Singapore’s only winning entry, and by being named Best Restaurant Bar for a second consecutive year at The Bar Awards Singapore.

In celebration of Cherry Heering’s 200th anniversary, Joe says his cocktail was inspired by the extremely iconic Cherry Red Ford Mustang that was created in 1966.

“I wanted to work with flavours that play well with Cherry Herring and were relevant to our beverage philosophy at Tippling Club where we blur the lines between kitchen and bar. In the Mustang we use an Apple Cider Gastrique, a combination of caramel and apple cider vinegar that works beautifully with the flavour profile of the Cherry Herring.”

 

MUSTANG

35ml Bourbon

15ml Cherry Heering

27.5ml Apple Cider Gastrique*

1 Dash Peychaud Bitters

Glass: Rocks

Method: Stir all ingredients with ice and serve on one block ice

Garnish: Long lemon and long orange twists

 

*Apple Cider Gastrique:

20ml Caramel Syrup

7.5ml Apple Cider Vinegar

Caramel Syrup:

200g Caster Sugar, 4tbsp Water

Heat caster sugar in pan with water on a medium/high heat without stirring.

Gently brush sides frequently with a wet pastry brush. In 5-8 minutes the bubbling mixture will turn to a light blond colour.

Allow to cool for 10 minutes and then add70g additional water

Irish Whiskey Cocktail Recipes on alcademics.com

by Camper English

A few weeks ago I put out a call for Irish whiskey cocktail recipes for my Fine Cooking column. I received too many responses to use, so I thought I’d gather them here for all to enjoy.

Dodgeball
Drew Record of Playground


2 oz Connemara Peated Irish Whiskey
.75 oz Benedictine
.5 oz Cherry Herring
3 dashes Bittermens Xocolatl Mole Bitters

Build in rocks glass with ice, stir, garnish with a brandied cherry.
wiev all recipes under

http://www.alcademics.com/2012/03/irish-whiskey-cocktail-recipes.htmlder

 

BLOOD AND SAND on adrianneelizabeth.blogspot.se

And lastly, a lesser known bourbon cocktail (just
something to impress your bourbon savvy friends):  The Blood and Sand (scary
name, strangely tasty drink).  This prohibition era cocktail, was named after
the movie, Blood and Sand, starring Rudolph Valentino, about a young-boy who
becomes a famous bull-fighter.
3/4 oz. Scotch Whiskey (can substitute bourbon of your
choice)
3/4 oz. Cherry Herring
3/4 oz. Sweet Vermouth
3/4 oz. Orange juice (preferably
fresh-squeezed)
Combine in shaker with a scoop of ice.  Shake and strain
into cocktail glass.  Garnish with orange and enjoy!
Recently, BarSmarts deemed the Blood and Sand
one of the Top 25 cocktails that every bartender should know how to make
well.  Blood and Sand on

Heering on chickenangel.com

HTTP://CHICKENANGEL.COM/CATEGORY/BOOZE
Kelsey’s not going to comment on this one
I wanted to make something with the Cherry Heering (mostly because I just really like saying “Cherry Heering” because of the way it makes me want to say “Cherry Herring” which makes me think of swedish fish, which, really, taste-wise, is not far off) and I found recipes for Singapore Slings and variations of, from which I concocted my own devious cocktail.
And when I say “devious”, I obviously mean “grossly sweet and girly”. I didn’t mean for it to be so. But I guess you can’t have Cherry Heering, Benedictine and St. Germain together without getting something, you know, sweet.
So here it is. A drink we may never try again. It’s not bad, really, just wussy.
1 1/2 oz Junipero gin
1/2 oz Cherry Heering
1/4 oz Benedictine
1/4 oz St. Germain
1/4 oz lime juice
dash(es) Angostura bitters
Shake gently with ice, strain into glass and top with soda water.

Cherry Heering – popartdiva – Singapore Sling

http://popartdiva.com/The%20Martini%20Diva/Martini%20Recipe%20Pages/Pink%20Sling-A-Tini.html

THE PINK SLING-A-TINI aka a Singapore Sling Martini
A classic pink cocktail for classy women

Ingredients: Gin, Cointreau, Benedictine,Lime Juice,Cherry Herring or Kirsch, Pineapple Juice, Grenadine, Bitters

The Pink Sling-a-Tini is my take on the Singapore Sling that was created by Ngiam Tong Boon at the Long Bar of the world famous Raffles Hotel in Singapore. Originally called the Straits Sling or possibly derived from it this was a popular drink during the 1920s and then again in the 1950s.

I believe the original recipe used Kirsch instead of the Cherry Heering and you can try this recipe both ways – I prefer the Cherry Heering myself.

This is a very sweet “girly” drink but don’t be taken in by it’s pink color and the sweetness – this one packs a serious punch!

Ingredients: Gin, Cointreau, Benedictine,Lime Juice,Cherry Herring or Kirsch, Pineapple Juice, Grenadine, Bitters

The Pink Sling-a-Tini is my take on the Singapore Sling that was created by Ngiam Tong Boon at the Long Bar of the world famous Raffles Hotel in Singapore. Originally called the Straits Sling or possibly derived from it this was a popular drink during the 1920s and then again in the 1950s.

I believe the original recipe used Kirsch instead of the Cherry Heering and you can try this recipe both ways – I prefer the Cherry Heering myself.

This is a very sweet “girly” drink but don’t be taken in by it’s pink color and the sweetness – this one packs a serious punch!

Excerpt from www.amateurcocktailguy.com

The following could be read on the blog amateurcockatilguy.com the other day:

A Thank You gift
December 5th, 2008

Amateur Cocktail Guy got caught a little exposed last night. Several times a month work intrudes into the cocktail hour. We tea-total those nights and always make sure I can get away if called. A combination of last minute events put me in a bind and I had to call the Amateur Cocktail Friends for some help. Always gracious, they came through without flinching. I owe them a big one, so I went to work in the ACG test kitchen.
Not everything that passes these lips makes it to these pages. Last weeks I stirred up a recipe from the latest issue of Imbibe. They offered a collection of cocktail recipes for holiday parties. One caught my eye – a mix of Bourbon and Cherry Herring. I’ve been a little taken with Cherry Heering after I spent some time in Atlanta this summer tracking down a bottle. I’ve enjoyed it in Blood and Sands, and wanted to try some other drinks that included it. I mixed one up last week and enjoyed it – slowly, over an hour or so.
It’s a liquor drink with no added juice or syrups. Stir it with ice to dilute and chill it a bit, then sip. It’s not bad. Tim Stookey of The Presidio Social Club in San Fransisco developed the drink. He calls it “And to All a Good Night…” In the article he indicates that he wanted “spiciness” in the drink. He nailed it. I think it works great as an aperitif.
As I was trying to figure out how to thank the friends, it struck me that this drink could be mixed up ahead in bigger batches and poured as needed. A little math indicated that a quadruple recipe would fill a 375 ml bottle. My ABC stop today was to pick up a bottle of Maker’s Mark. It cleaned up nicely. Next, I mixed 6 oz Bourbon with 3 oz each Cherry Heering and Tequila. Bitters were added, then back into the bottle. I got a little crafty with Photoshop and turned out new labels.
I’ll deliver in the morning, fingers crossed that they’ll enjoy it.

www.amateurcocktailguy.com

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