NYC Beverage Leo Robitschek Concocts Modern Classics With Cherry Heering on talesofthecocktail.com

by Jennifer Nalewicki

From a go-to ingredient to a bartender’s staple, this Danish liqueur stands out.

Cherry Heering Liqueur has been a go-to ingredient for Leo Robitschek for years. The beverage director for New York City-based Make It Nice restaurant group’s Made Nice, Eleven Madison Park, and The NoMad Hotel had been using it to make classic cocktails like the Singapore Sling and Blood & Sand, but it wasn’t until 2008 that he started experimenting with the ruby-red liqueur and creating cocktails he could call his own.

One of his first concoctions was the Eclipse, a mix of Cherry Heering Liqueur, tequila, Aperol, and lemon juice. Impressed with the way that the Cherry Heering and Aperol worked in tandem by balancing each other out, he later paired the two again along with rye whiskey, chiles, and lime juice to create what would soon become one of The Nomad Hotel’s best-selling cocktails: the Satan’s Circus (pictured below). Named after the property’s location in the city’s entertainment and red-light district in midtown, which in the 1800s was nicknamed “Satan’s Circus” by reformers thanks to its preponderance of gambling dens, brothels, and saloons, the result is a drink that mixes bitterness with a hint of heat.

“The Cherry Heering and Aperol have complementary flavors — one of them has cherry while the other has rhubarb and strawberry — so you have a blend of red fruits,” Robitschek says. “The Aperol brings in a bitter quality that balances out the Cherry Heering’s citrus notes and nuttiness. Together they make a really delicious and balanced flavor.”

More recently, this spring Robitschek introduced members of the global bartending industry to the wonders of pairing Cherry Heering with Aperol, along with a dozen other spirits during the two master classes he led in Madrid and Barcelona (taught entirely in Spanish!) as part of the iconic brand’s 200th anniversary celebration. Robitschek is one of a handful of bartenders that the brand cherry-picked (pun intended) to lead a series of workshops and master classes in more than 75 cities over the course of 100 days. Called “Modern Classics,” the three-month event serves as a way to get bartenders thinking of ways to use the cherry liqueur to make new cocktail classics back home at their bars.

For his master classes, one of the first things Robitschek did was have his students sample Cherry Heering along with a dozen base spirits, such as rye, sake, tequila, and, of course, Aperol, as well as bitters, produce, and other modifiers.

“We did a blind tasting with the Cherry Heering blended together with the other spirits to see how they changed and what attributes the Cherry Heering brought out in each spirit,” he says. “Once everyone decided which flavor combination they liked the best, we split everyone into groups and had a mini competition where they built cocktails using that combination of flavors to create a modern-day classic. Cherry Heering is an ingredient that most bars have on hand if they’re trying to create some form of the classics like the Blood & Sand or the Singapore Sling, so most bartenders have used it before and are comfortable with it.”

Two combinations that surprised Robitschek included Cherry Heering with sake and again with Green Chartreuse.

“Leading classes like this, you always hope that you learn something new and gain something from it,” he says. “There were a few flavor combinations that I had never tasted before on their own without mixing in other ingredients, so it was interesting to see how they did work

We can only hope that one day in the near future one of these combinations will wind up on Robitschek’s drink list.

Satan’s Circus

  • 2 oz Old Overholt Rye
  • ¾ oz Thai-Bird Chili Infused Aperol
  • ¾ oz Cherry Heering
  • ¾ oz Lemon Juice

Directions: Shake and strain into a cocktail coupe

Vanguard Adds Heering Cherry Liqueur To Portfolio on theshout.com.au

Vanguard Luxury Brands is very proud to announce that it is adding the iconic bar classic Heering Cherry liqueur to its portfolio. The brand has been in Australia for many years and dating back to 1818, it is available in more than 100 countries around the world.

“When we were approached last year to take on Heering Cherry liqueur, we were incredibly excited because this iconic liqueur fits perfectly with Vanguard’s philosophy of providing the best brands to the best bars”, said James France of Vanguard. “Iconic is an often overused word but in this case, it truly fits the Heering brand. Without it, we wouldn’t have the Singapore Sling, the Blood & Sand or any number of other classic and modern cocktails.”

Heering Cherry is a ruby-red liqueur made by soaking lightly crushed Danish cherries and a blend of spices in neutral grain spirits, then cask-maturing the mixture for up to five years, adding sugar during the ageing process.

Available from Vanguard Luxury Brands, phone 1300 DRINKS or go to www.vanguardluxurybrands.com

The Resurrection of Cherry Heering on forbes.com

by David Rosengarten

In a sense, I am the living chronicle of Cherry Heering.

No, I wasn’t alive in 1818, when the cherry-flavored liqueur was first manufactured by grocery assistant Peter Frederik Suhm Heering in Copenhagen, Denmark…and shortly thereafter became a worldwide sensation, some would even say “the first global brand.” Damn, I missed the first 140 years or so.

But the last fifty years…such a turbulent era for Cherry Heering? Oh boy. I got it!

When I was a kid, growing up in New York City, Cherry Heering was one of the staples in my parents’ liquor cabinet. Mum and Dad weren’t proto-mixology types (I think the only drink that ever got mixed in my house was the Screwdriver). But like so many Old World Jews, they’d long for a lick of “schnapps” after dinner. And that’s when the deep-red stuff with the natural cherry flavor would often come out to moisten the miniature cut-glass crystal.

Then…a funny thing happened on the way to the 1970s. There were many, many cool things for kids like me to drink in the late ’60s, early ’70s hippie era…but Cherry Heering wasn’t one of them. In the minds of my Baby Boom generation…Cherry Heering was something, again, that your Mum and Dad had in their liquor cabinet while you were growing up.

For a long time in this era, Cherry Heering was not cool.

Intriguingly though…and that’s why I’m taking your time today…Cherry Heering clawed its way back and, today, is the very height of cool.

Why? In a word…mixologists.

For starters…where did this mixology thing come from? Then…why did they bring Cherry Heering with them?

David Wondrich, the guru of mixology, opines that the mixology movement—in which bartenders were transformed from guys stirring drinks in seedy bars to newly-minted rock stars in glam surroundings—picked up steam “about 20 years ago. The Internet allowed many drink-minded people to talk together, all over the world, about cocktails.”

If these folks were also doing their research on the Internet, if they were looking for established classics to fire their imaginations and enrich their retro-new wave drinks…there’s nothing out there with a more glorious tradition to be discovered than Cherry Heering. It was time to forget your parents’ liquor cabinet stodginess; in the 1990s Cherry Heering, to a new generation, was suddenly coming across as a venerated classic!

You have but to start googling. The sheer number of historic royal courts that took in Cherry Heering is staggering: the Royal Danish Court in 1876; the Imperial Russian Court in 1878; the Prince of Wales in the same year; the King of England in 1901. Then there’s the history of the Singapore Sling, one of the most renowned cocktails of all time—invented at Raffle’s Bar in Singapore in 1915, and requiring Cherry Heering (along with pineapple juice, lime juice, grenadine and other things). Another early 20th-century cocktail requiring Cherry Heering is Blood & Sand, taking its name from the 1922 film starring Rudolph Valentino. Cherry Heering, within a century, had developed iconic status.
With the same bartending spirit that stood behind the Singapore Sling and Blood & Sand, modern mixologists flocked to the glam-again Cherry Heering in the 1990s. Why, other than the historic record? “It adds a lovely cherry fruitiness to a drink,” David Wondrich says, “without being too sweet or sticky. And…it has a really nice acidity.”

I guess you could say it has something really important going for it as a mixer: it mixes really well.

To me, the beauty of the thing’s not just in the mixing. Completely my parents’ child, I don’t spend a lot of time mixing drinks…but the post-prandial nip is very important to me.

I had my personal reunion with Cherry Heering last spring, at a hipster bar in Brooklyn. I drank it straight, in a little glass. I was amazed.

The stuff was very serious looking—by which I mean, it had no tricked-up colors, no overwhelming visual seductivesness. In the glass, it looks like good red wine that may be 20-30 years old; it’s a mix of medium-hued garnet (NOT scary-dark) with a little encroaching brown…and the classic edge of onion skin that forms the meniscus of a good red wine. The nose is even better: cherries are olfactorily front and center, but not cliché cherries. Cherry Heering is made from a special strain of cherry: the diminutive Stevns cherry, which grows wild in Denmark, yielding the aromatic intensity that only cold-weather cherries can yield. The fruit is mixed on the nose with a jam-like dimension, a touch of prune, and an array of hard-to-nail spices that Cherry Heering holds out as a “proprietary secret.”

And then there’s the palate. If something about sweet wine is a turn-off to you, I would at least urge you to give this sweet elixir a try…for it is so much more than just a sweet drink. In fact, the world’s greatest wine connoisseurs often adore sweet wines—because their flavors and textures can be larger than life (or at least larger than wine!) In the Cherry Heering, the sweetness doesn’t seem “that” sweet—largely because it is cut by a spry, playful fruit acidity. The other thing you notice immediatey is the plush texture: this is one of the most viscous, seductive spirits you’ll ever taste…but one that actually encourages you to take another sip, and another. Lastly, the explosion of flavor. The liqueur was made by aging a mix of crushed Danish Stevns cherries in neutral spirits for five years…and all that time rings true on the palate, creating a cherry-jammy-spicy-almost minty layering of exciting tastes.

My first comparative thought last spring, while tasting? “This is like drinking really great Port, but with a dazzling array of extra flavors.”

Of course, the mixologists who brought on this glorious modern era of Cherry Heering are not going away…and you should definitely try the fruits of their labors, as well. In fact, to make sure there are plenty of fruits, the company itself holds an annual “Sling” competition, looking for great new cocktais all over the world that include Cherry Heering. Winners have come from far and wide, and they have left their cocktail recipes for the rest of us to enjoy. In October 2014, a Bar Director from Bar Ruby in Copenhagen, Denmark—Nick Kobbernagel Hovind—won the competition with a version of the Singapore Sling that included Aquavit; it showed just how flexible Heering mixing can be.

He was trying to make a Sling that is “more European in style,” he said—a direct reference to the oft-pineappley Slings you find in Singapore. He was elated after the competition, not for his personal triumph—but because, as he said, “I’ve brought the Sling back to Denmark!”

Its ancestral home, of course.

The Winner:

The Sloe Sling

1 oz. Cherry Heering
3/4 oz. Bitter Truth Sloe Gin
2 oz. Aalborg Aquavit
3 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
1.5 oz. fresh lemon juice
1/2 oz. simple syrup
1 small dash egg white
1 oz. soda wate

Combine the first seven ingredients in a Boston shaker glass. Shake hard for 8 seconds. Double strain into a very chilled Palais glass. Top with soda and stir. Garnish with a lemon slice.

Weekend Cocktail: Blood & Sand on thefederalist.com

May 11, 2014 By

Vacations, if you’re fortunate enough to take one, are a beautiful concept. You might travel or stay at home, but you’ve reclaimed your time for yourself. You can use it as you see fit.

If you’re anything like me and my wife, though, you tend to pack a lot of activity into the short time you’re away. See this monument; visit this museum; hike this trail; make good time; back on the road; you just peed an hour ago; hold it.

I’ve started to think that may not be the best approach. I read once that when you pay for a vacation, you aren’t simply paying for the experience of being in a place. You’re really paying for the memories you’re making. They are yours to recall any time you like, the next day or twenty years on. For a brief instant you can be back there in the sun, or the woods, or the city, or wherever. In light of that, it’s best to slow down and appreciate where you are rather than how fast you’re getting someplace else.

The same idea applies to a good cocktail. So much of our experience with food and drink is contextual – if you’re having a good time, it will taste better. You can get trashed in a hurry and make all sorts of hazy memories, but taking the time to really savor a well-prepared drink is something that can add layers of enjoyment to where you are, and who you’re with, and how you remember it.

Blood & Sand

The Blood & Sand is a unique and enjoyable scotch cocktail, one of the few. Named for a 1922 movie about bullfighting and how women ruin it, the drink appeared around 1930 in the Savoy Cocktail Book.

I first had a Blood & Sand while I was traveling (incidentally, while meeting with the publisher of this very online magazine) and was immediately impressed by it. It’s easy drinking, which is not to say it is a weak drink. Very potent, as I discovered upon consumption of the second (it was that kind of meeting).

You’ll need:

  • 1 oz. Famous Grouse scotch
  • 1 oz. sweet vermouth
  • 1 oz. Cherry Heering brandy
  • 1 oz. fresh orange juice (ideally blood orange)
  • orange peel (cut into a coin shape)
  • 1 match

The Blood & Sand is a breeze to prepare. Simply add the liquid ingredients to a shaker with ice, do the needful, and then strain into a cocktail or coupe glass. Between the vermouth and cherry brandy, the drink will be suffused with red and quite pleasing to the eye. But wait, there’s more.

Cut a coin-sized disc from the orange peel. Don’t be afraid to cut deep, as the pith will aid you in what you are about to do. Light the match and hold it over the glass. Bring the peel close, and squeeze citrus oil into the flame. It will flare up, providing a dramatic touch and ever-so-gently altering the flavor. I gave the rim of my glass a light kiss with the peel, but this is not strictly necessary.

After you finish delighting those around you with your dash and elan, discard the peel and enjoy. The sweetness of the brandy and vermouth is kept in check by the scotch. The orange rounds things off and ties all the flavors together.

Fresh orange juice is a must. If they are available you can use blood orange for its sweetness and hue, but it’s not a requirement.

I chose the Famous Grouse scotch because that was how it was first served to me, and I saw no pressing need to mess with a good thing. A blend is a solid bet for this one, as a single malt may come on a wee bit strong and overpower the other flavors (though you should let your own taste be your guide). The Famous Grouse is lighter in body, but strong enough that it is not wholly subsumed by the competing flavors.

The vermouth shouldn’t be too big and complex. Carpano Antica is great, but after thorough testing I’ve determined it could be a little much for this drink. Your lighter Martini & Rossi or Cinzano will do fine, and allow the cherry brandy to shine through.

Speaking of which, the cherry brandy was also tricky for me to nail down. Much of what you’ll find on shelves tastes a bit like Robitussin, and should be avoided. Many recipes call for Cherry Heering, a Danish liqueur with strong, natural cherry flavors and vibrant ruby color. I went with a Grand Marnier Cherry cognac I had on hand, which performed very well but wasn’t quite there. The Heering is worth tracking down for this one.

The Blood & Sand is a perfect drink after a long day, whether you were at work or on vacation. Just remember to take your time and enjoy what you’re doing, wherever you are.

Follow Neal on Twitter.

scientistmcgee.com “an amateur mixologist’s journey in to the world of spirits…”

Well, I hope everyone had a great Memorial Day holiday weekend.  I sure did!  Today was my first day back to work after a really nice, long 5 day weekend.  I really didn’t make many new cocktails over the holiday weekend however, instead focusing more on drinks best suited for brunches and do-nothing relaxation such as the Bloody Mary and Mimosas.  Now that I’m no longer just lounging around with nowhere to be at any certain time, and back to keeping a schedule, I need drinks better suited for enjoying after a long day of work, unwinding in the evening time.

In this post, I have 3 good cocktails to share with you… two of them, the “Blinker” and the “Xanthia Cocktail”, being very old drinks from books of mine and the 3rd being one of my own creation, named 5 minutes ago after my St. Louis neighborhood – the “Clifton Heights Cocktail”.

“Xanthia Cocktail”

The Xanthia Cocktail is not one of my favorite drinks, but it’s a decent one.  I picked this one out of “The Savoy Cocktail Book”.  The yellow Chartreuse definitely takes center stage in this aromatic drink with a kick.  The cherry brandy and gin hang in the background, blending nicely and both slightly mellowing and propping up the Chartreuse front and center.  If you want a Chartreuse drink, this is it for you.  If you’re not in the mood for a Chartreuse drink, this is not it for you.

1 oz. Cherry Heering

1 oz. yellow Chartreuse

1 oz. dry gin

Shake well with ice, and then strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

(“The Savoy Cocktail Book”)


“Clifton Heights Cocktail”

Last but not least… actually this one’s my favorite of the three.  I’ve been experimenting lately with modifying one of my favorite cocktails, the “Blood & Sand”, by tinkering with its 4 ingredients (1:1:1:1) and switching out different ingredients a couple at a time.

Rather than starting a completely new drink totally from scratch, this tinkering method is a nice, easy and safe foray in to creating my own cocktails.  The “Blood & Sand” is made of equal parts scotch, Cherry Heering, orange juice and sweet vermouth.  In follow-up to my recent reminder of the fact that I love rye and I love grapefruit, surprise…  I worked those two favorite ingredients of mine in to the classic B&S recipe!  I swapped the scotch with rye whiskey and the orange juice with grapefruit, keeping the Cherry Heering and the sweet vermouth.  And it turns out to be a really great drink!  It’s still got the rich, dark sweetness of a Blood & Sand because of the Cherry Heering, but because of having grapefruit instead of orange, it’s not quite as sweet.  It’s less of an “out there” flavor combination than the Blood & Sand, and more of a familiar, common sense flavor mix.  While I love the Blood & Sand because it’s kind of a crazy mixture of unique, vibrant flavors, I like this drink a lot because it’s got some of the same elements while being a really great balance of a smooth, no-nonsense flavor combination.  I’m proud to say that I really like this cocktail.  And since I couldn’t think of a clever name that’s a fun twist on the Blood & Sand moniker, I stuck with just naming the drink I made up, derived from one of my favorite cocktails, after the St. Louis neighborhood I live in and love, Clifton Heights.

Equal parts…

-rye whiskey

-Cherry Heering

-grapefruit juice

-sweet vermouth

Shake well with ice, and then strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.


“Clifton Heights Cocktail”

Last but not least… actually this one’s my favorite of the three. I’ve been experimenting lately with modifying one of my favorite cocktails, the “Blood & Sand”, by tinkering with its 4 ingredients (1:1:1:1) and switching out different ingredients a couple at a time.

Rather than starting a completely new drink totally from scratch, this tinkering method is a nice, easy and safe foray in to creating my own cocktails. The “Blood & Sand” is made of equal parts scotch, Cherry Heering, orange juice and sweet vermouth. In follow-up to my recent reminder of the fact that I love rye and I love grapefruit, surprise…
I worked those two favorite ingredients of mine in to the classic B&S recipe! I swapped the scotch with rye whiskey and the orange juice with grapefruit, keeping the Cherry Heering and the sweet vermouth. And it turns out to be a really great drink! It’s still got the rich, dark sweetness of a Blood & Sand because of the Cherry Heering, but because of having grapefruit instead of orange, it’s not quite as sweet. It’s less of an “out there” flavor combination than the Blood & Sand, and more of a familiar, common sense
flavor mix. While I love the Blood & Sand because it’s kind of a crazy mixture of unique, vibrant flavors, I like this drink a lot because it’s got some of the same elements while being a really great balance of a smooth, no-nonsense flavor combination. I’m proud to say that I really like this cocktail. And since I couldn’t think of a clever name that’s a fun twist on the Blood & Sand moniker, I stuck with just naming the drink I made up, derived from one of my favorite cocktails, after the St. Louis neighborhood I live in and love, Clifton Heights.

Equal parts…

-rye whiskey

-Cherry Heering

-grapefruit juice

-sweet vermouth

Shake well with ice, and then
strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

Blood and Sand on communitymatters.biz

…..Dessert was a Conconut Panna Cotta, served with a Blood & Sand (grouse scotch, orange juice, cocchi vermouth and cherry heering) and accompanied by Graham’s Spanish Spy Movie. All three were fun and explosive….

http://communitymatters.biz/2011/04/26/eat-drink-listen/

Cherry Heering Blood and Sand – on American Drink –

April 13th 2011
Blood and Sand
by Albert McMurry

I’ve never actually tasted a Blood & Sand. It seems like that classic foreign film I keep wanting to watch, but I just can’t bring myself queue up whenever I sit down for movietime.
— JT Dobbs
First they wrote the book1, then they made a movie2 (for which the drink is named,) then they remade it four separate times, once with Sharon Stone. The French re-imagined it as a study of male friendship and determination with a sprinkling of anti-war sentiment and homoerotic undertones3. The STARZ Network simply used the title for their boob-n-gore-soaked, gladiatorial man-drama, Spartacus: Blood and Sand.
If all that sounds confusing, off-putting or even intriguing, let me present to you the ingredients:
The Blood and Sand
 1 – 1.5 oz. blended scotch
 1 oz. fresh orange Juice
 3/4 oz. sweet vermouth
 3/4 oz. cherry brandy
Shake this unholy gaggle of ingredients with ice and strain into a coupe or martini glass. Garnish with a good cherry and if you’re really going to go this far, a flamed orange zest.
It tastes a lot like chewing a wooden popsicle stick on a hot day: sweet and woody and strange but you can’t stop yourself. And if that doesn’t do it for you, think of that as a sexual innuendo.

Or don’t3.
I’ve said before that I don’t mix scotch drinks. It’s a hard liquor to balance and why do that to the lovely single malts that exist in the world. *Don’t*. Use a blended scotch like Chivas or Johnny Walker. The smokey, dry flavors of the scotch along with the acidity of fresh juice helps cut the sweetness of the vermouth and cherry brandy.
I try to stay away from ultimatums but for this drink you really must use fresh-squeezed orange juice. If you have blood oranges, even better. Store-bought juice will most likely contain added sugar that isn’t needed.
Yes, this is a sweet drink and I’m not a huge fan of overly sweet drinks. The original recipe calls for 3/4 to 1 ounce of each ingredient but I found that cutting down on the sweet vermouth and Cherry Heering makes it a reasonable two-or-three-drink sipper. Otherwise, it’s nice as a dessert drink.
You’ll find yourself trying to explain it to your friends, making excuses for yourself that end with you giggling “It’s
great. I like it. I don’t know!” Once you try it, you’ll want it again.
Like sex with a Black man.

Heering at Alcademics.com

http://www.alcademics.com/2011/01/cocktail-menu-haddingtons-in-austin-texas.html

Visit Restaurant Haddington Austin TX and drink:
Blood & Sand: scotch, cherry heering, sweet vermouth, orange

Heering at 8milediaries – Blood & Sand

http://8milediaries.blogspot.com/2010/12/atlas-room.html
8 Mile Diaries

Atlas Room
On Saturday we dined at the Atlas Room and enjoyed one of the best meals we’ve had all year. We started with a Blood & Sand, described as having “The Famous Grouse Scotch Whisky, Carpano Italian Vermouth, Cherry Heering, Fresh Squeezed Orange Juice.” ….
Great service, a perfect cocktail!

Legal Notice   |   Log in to graphic guideline