Grant is becoming The Usual suspect for prize drinks on inverness-courier.co.uk

Written byGregor White

AN INVERNESS bartender is continuing his winning ways with a prize trip to the Big Apple.

Last month Grant Murray (30), general manager of Inverness cocktail bars Bar One and Scotch & Rye, was crowned world champ in the Cherry Heering Classics Competition, seeing off more than 2500 other entries from 46 different countries.

In that case his prize-winning creation was Brace Position – a mix of Ardbeg 10 whisky, Botanist gin, Creme de Violet, Cherry Heering, lime juice and sugar syrup.

Now he has also shown what he can do with Jack Daniels after his drink called The Usual emerged as one of three winners in an international search run by the drink giant through their Tennessee Calling competition.

Described by Grant himself as “a simple cocktail with complex flavours that takes a classic jack and coke and spins it on its head” it seriously impressed judges who travelled to Inverness to sample it and listen to the story that inspired it.

Grant said: “I based it around my journey from where I started to where I am today within the world of bartending and hospitality.

“The good, the bad and the ugly all played an important part, and Jack Daniels was present throughout.”

His skills will now see him heading to New York bar The Dead Rabbit, recently voted the best bar in the world by industry journal Drinks International.

Working and helping to plan an event there to mark Prohibition Repeal Day in December after that he also gets the chance to fly to the Tennessee home of Jack Daniels to learn from master distiller Jeff Arnett how the drink is actually made.

“Anyone who knows me knows that this is literally a dream come true for me,” said Grant.

“I am absolutely blown away.

“What I have achieved this past year has been far beyond anything I could imagine.”

Get Ready for Holiday Spirits on t2conline.com

by Elizabeth Taylor

It is that time of the year when we all love to celebrate. Cheerful bliss is in the air and toasts are coming your way.

We took a look at some of the hottest brands on the market and here is a list of some of our favorite spirits for mixing your holiday drinks for festive fun.

Heering Liqueur – This is a fantastic selection for several occasions this season. The classic Cherry flavor dating from 1818 is well known and will warm up any cold winter night. The extension flavor of coffee is made from all natural ingredients and contains no additives or artificial coloring. The base of Caribbean rum, cacao and coffee is bold and maintains allure. There is a slight trace of caffeine in this gluten free product that will add a lovely kick to your White Russian. Who doesn’t need a little wake me up after a few hours at an office cocktail mixer?

Another amazing option is a select cocktail called the Coffee Berry. Take two parts of Coffee Herring and mix with one part blackberry liqueur Crème De Mur, two parts fresh pressed lemon juice, and one part simple syrup. Garnish with a blackberry and get ready to be the highlight of the party.

Bringing It Back Bar: What to Do with Cherry Heering on hospitalitytimes.ie

by Chloe Frechette

Undoubtedly the most storied of cherry liqueurs, Cherry Heering is also among the longest-lived; invented in 1818, it’s remained the category’s calling card for nearly two centuries—and for good reason. Having gained a reputation for quality early on, the liqueur has, in recent decades, earned a strong following among bartenders who regularly ask for it by name, not only in classic recipes like the Singapore Sling and the Blood and Sand, but in new ones, too.

Originally created by Danish merchant Peter Heering, the recipe for his namesake liqueur has changed very little since its invention. Historically produced by macerating crushed Stevns cherries (a particularly aromatic strain native to Denmark) in neutral spirit alongside a blend of spices, Heering is perhaps best known for its uniquely complex flavor profile and rich texture, much of which is imparted during the aging process; prior to bottling, the liqueur sees oak for a minimum of three years, and up to five.

Heer, Heer

 

Emotional Rescue

Part of an expanding family of Manhattan spin-offs, this cocktail adds cherry liqueur and French quinquina to the base of rye whiskey.

Cooper’s Regard

Cherry Heering shines alongside falernum and manzanilla sherry in this rye-based cocktail from Break Room 86.

Koffie Van Brunt

In this unorthodox take on Irish Coffee, Cherry Heering adds a complex sweetness to the blend espresso and aged rum.

More Recipes →

So popular was Heering in the first few decades of its existence that it became a successful worldwide brand—not to mention a favorite of European royalty. A supplier to the Royal Danish Court beginning in 1876, it would make its way to both the Imperial Russian Court and that of the Prince of Wales, in 1878. In 1901, the King of England followed suit, and, to this day, Cherry Heering remains a purveyor to Queen Elizabeth II.

In cocktails, Heering has played a historically critical role, though notably, its centrality to certain iconic recipes has been based more in retroactive decision-making. Though Heering is now widely accepted as an integral component in the Blood and Sand cocktail, for example, the first reference to the drink in Harry Craddock’s 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book did not specify brands—nor did similarly dated Singapore Sling recipes, which called simply for “cherry brandy.”

The brand name was formally aligned with both drinks sometime later, and was chiefly a comment on quality. As Dale DeGroff notes in an addendum to his The Essential Cocktail, “There are some products whose best brand is not a matter of dispute, and cherry liqueur is one of them. . . There’s no substitute for this world-class, wonderfully dry, versatile liqueur; if [Cherry Heering’s] not available, don’t make a Blood and Sand.”

When Heering is called for, opinions differ on precisely how much to add in both new and classic drinks. At Fort Defiance in Red Hook, head bartender and owner St. John Frizell adds a full ounce of the liqueur to his Singapore Sling—double the amount specified in many historical recipes.

“That really makes that drink,” explains Frizell. “[Cherry Heering] provides this profound depth of flavor that is hard to get from any other ingredient.” Equally unexpected is his original Koffie Van Brunt, a hot, rum-based drink that showcases Heering alongside espresso. Topped with a cream float, the cherry liqueur lends a deep, complex sweetness to this unorthodox twist on an Irish Coffee.

Bartender Caitlin Pfeiffer, meanwhile, highlights Heering alongside both sweet and savory flavors, calling on falernum and manzanilla sherry in her rye whiskey-based Cooper’s Regard. “[The drink] is about demonstrating how Cherry Heering can bring about its own bold flavor,” she explains, “while simultaneously enhancing the spice notes of [the] other ingredients.”

Brian Miller adopts a similar approach in his nuanced variation on the Bensonhurst (itself a variation on the Manhattan), building on a rye base by adding incremental measures of Cherry Heering, maraschino, dry vermouth and quinquina wine. Dubbed the Emotional Rescue by Donna’s Karen Fu, the drink calls for just half a teaspoon of Cherry Heering.

“A small amount goes a long way to achieve balance,” explains Wu, who asserts that, unlike other liqueurs, Cherry Heering on its own isn’t necessarily pleasant, let alone palatable. Nonetheless, she gives it a coveted spot on the backbar.

“Cherry Heering is a liqueur that may surprisingly remain as a classic mainstay in the ever-growing cherry category,” says Wu. “[It] bridges the gap of old and new guard in the spirit world; we continue to come back to it.”

Bringing It Back Bar: What to Do with Cherry Heering on punchdrink.com

In “Bringing It Back Bar,” we shine a light on overlooked bottles and devise recipes to take them from back bar to front shelf. Up now: Cherry Heering.

By CHLOE FRECHETTE

Undoubtedly the most storied of cherry liqueurs, Cherry Heering is also among the longest-lived; invented in 1818, it’s remained the category’s calling card for nearly two centuries—and for good reason. Having gained a reputation for quality early on, the liqueur has, in recent decades, earned a strong following among bartenders who regularly ask for it by name, not only in classic recipes like the Singapore Sling and the Blood and Sand, but in new ones, too.

Originally created by Danish merchant Peter Heering, the recipe for his namesake liqueur has changed very little since its invention. Historically produced by macerating crushed Stevns cherries (a particularly aromatic strain native to Denmark) in neutral spirit alongside a blend of spices, Heering is perhaps best known for its uniquely complex flavor profile and rich texture, much of which is imparted during the aging process; prior to bottling, the liqueur sees oak for a minimum of three years, and up to five.

So popular was Heering in the first few decades of its existence that it became a successful worldwide brand—not to mention a favorite of European royalty. A supplier to the Royal Danish Court beginning in 1876, it would make its way to both the Imperial Russian Court and that of the Prince of Wales, in 1878. In 1901, the King of England followed suit, and, to this day, Cherry Heering remains a purveyor to Queen Elizabeth II.

In cocktails, Heering has played a historically critical role, though notably, its centrality to certain iconic recipes has been based more in retroactive decision-making. Though Heering is now widely accepted as an integral component in the Blood and Sand cocktail, for example, the first reference to the drink in Harry Craddock’s 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book did not specify brands—nor did similarly dated Singapore Sling recipes, which called simply for “cherry brandy.”

The brand name was formally aligned with both drinks sometime later, and was chiefly a comment on quality. As Dale DeGroff notes in an addendum to his The Essential Cocktail, “There are some products whose best brand is not a matter of dispute, and cherry liqueur is one of them. . . There’s no substitute for this world-class, wonderfully dry, versatile liqueur; if [Cherry Heering’s] not available, don’t make a Blood and Sand.”

When Heering is called for, opinions differ on precisely how much to add in both new and classic drinks. At Fort Defiance in Red Hook, head bartender and owner St. John Frizell adds a full ounce of the liqueur to his Singapore Sling—double the amount specified in many historical recipes.

“That really makes that drink,” explains Frizell. “[Cherry Heering] provides this profound depth of flavor that is hard to get from any other ingredient.” Equally unexpected is his original Koffie Van Brunt, a hot, rum-based drink that showcases Heering alongside espresso. Topped with a cream float, the cherry liqueur lends a deep, complex sweetness to this unorthodox twist on an Irish Coffee.

Bartender Caitlin Pfeiffer, meanwhile, highlights Heering alongside both sweet and savory flavors, calling on falernum and manzanilla sherry in her rye whiskey-based Cooper’s Regard. “[The drink] is about demonstrating how Cherry Heering can bring about its own bold flavor,” she explains, “while simultaneously enhancing the spice notes of [the] other ingredients.”

Brian Miller adopts a similar approach in his nuanced variation on the Bensonhurst (itself a variation on the Manhattan), building on a rye base by adding incremental measures of Cherry Heering, maraschino, dry vermouth and quinquina wine. Dubbed the Emotional Rescue by Donna’s Karen Fu, the drink calls for just half a teaspoon of Cherry Heering.

“A small amount goes a long way to achieve balance,” explains Fu, who asserts that, unlike other liqueurs, Cherry Heering on its own isn’t necessarily pleasant, let alone palatable. Nonetheless, she gives it a coveted spot on the backbar.

“Cherry Heering is a liqueur that may surprisingly remain as a classic mainstay in the ever-growing cherry category,” says Fu. “[It] bridges the gap of old and new guard in the spirit world; we continue to come back to it.”

The Singapore Sling: Two Dallas bars give the much-storied cocktail a classic retelling on guidelive.com/bars-and-cocktails/2016/11/13/singapore-sling-two-dallas-bars-give-much-storied-cocktail-classic-retelling

By Marc Ramirez

The Singapore Sling is the Rashomon of cocktails: Everyone remembers it differently. Like a rumor that starts at one side of the table and wildly mutates by the time it comes back round again, it’s a tasty tale whose twists and turns vary depending on who’s doing the telling.
How is it still considered a classic?
Because despite its many tweaks – “The Singapore Sling has taken a lot of abuse over the years,” wrote tiki master Jeff Berry in his book Beachbum Berry Remixed – it’s managed to stay delicious no matter how it’s interpreted. Even gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson considered it a favorite.
But somewhere along the line, the century-old drink attributed to bartender Ngiam Tong Boon of Singapore’s Raffles Hotel lost sight of its simpler beginnings, becoming a tropical mishmash of seven ingredients or more – and a headache for bartenders, which may be why you rarely see it on bar menus. “I remember Sasha (Petraske, founder of the classic New York City bar Milk and Honey) was not a fan,” says Chad Solomon of Dallas’ Midnight Rambler, who worked with the late cocktail legend. “But people loved drinking it. He was, like, ‘It’s got too many damn ingredients!’ ”
It’s a misfit of a drink, a gin-powered cocktail that muscled its way into the tiki canon through luck and guile, disguising itself in pineapple and grenadine. But while its more dignified origins faded in the process, Midnight Rambler and another Dallas bar, Industry Alley, are breathing new life into the Sleeping Beauty that’s been there all along.
**
Imagine two actor brothers born in close succession. They look just enough alike, and their names are similar enough, that they’re often confused with each other. The older brother teaches the younger one all he knows, but the younger brother’s easier disposition makes him more likable than his rugged, reserved sibling. And when the younger’s career veers from drama into comedy, making him a star, the family name rises to fame with him.
That seems to be the story of the Singapore Sling, whose sweeter flavors and catchier name propelled it through the thick and thin of cocktail lineage rather than its older brother, the Straits Sling. A sling is a type of drink, at its base a simple mix of spirit, sweetener and water. As cocktails historian David Wondrich observed in his book Imbibe!, it’s “a simple drink in the same way a tripod is a simple device: Remove one leg and it cannot stand, set it up properly and it will hold the whole weight of the world.”
The Straits Sling, born sometime in the late 1800s, was just that: A blend of gin (spirit), sweetener (Benedictine, a honey-sweet herbal liqueuer) and carbonated soda (water), plus lemon and bitters. But its defining flavor was cherry – in the form of kirsch, a dry cherry brandy.
The original Singapore Sling – at least as well as anyone can figure out – was basically the same drink, except that it used sweet cherry brandy instead of dry and subbed lime as the citrus. That’s the Singapore Sling you’ll get if you order the classic drink at Midnight Rambler in downtown Dallas, and a few dashes of Angostura make all the difference, giving depth to what would otherwise taste like an off-kilter black cherry soda.
Adam McDowell features the drink in his entertaining and recently published Drinks: A User’s Guide, whose characterization is hard to argue with: “Here’s the correct recipe; ignore all other versions like the meaningless static they are.”
Ingredients
1 oz London dry gin
1 oz cherry brandy
1 oz Benedictine
1 oz lime
3 d Angostura bitters
Club soda
Instructions
Stir in a Collins glass. Garnish w/Maraschino cherries
You’ll also find the drink on the inaugural menu at Industry Alley just south of downtown, where owner Charlie Papaceno digs its less-is-more simplicity. “It’s like with French cooking: Here’s the mother sauce,” he says. “Here’s what we work from.”
But of course Papaceno had to tweak his version just a little. Rather than using equal parts, his recipe boosts the gin and tones down the liqueurs, with just a squeeze of lime. The drink is tart and a bit Scotchy thanks to its signature ingredient, Cherry Heering – not the summery cool pineapple drink the name usually calls to mind, but a leathery, autumn-ready gin-and-tonic.
“So, it’s like, to take it back,” Papaceno says. “Somehow it’s just gotten so tricked up.”

Until Wondrich tracked down the recipe above in a 1913 Singapore newspaper, no one really knew what the standard was for sure. By the late 1920s and early 1930s the rumor was a good ways down the table and already starting to morph; even the Raffles Hotel itself touted an “original” recipe in the 1930s with pineapple and grenadine, flowery additions that nonetheless endeared it to the wave of tiki that was just starting to emerge.
Before long the drink with the catchy name became a game of eeny meeny miny mo, something everyone did but felt free to put their own spin on. “Of all the recipes published for this drink, I have never seen any two that were alike,” wrote David Embury in The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948).
“It’s, like, to take it back. Somehow it’s gotten so tricked up.” — Charlie Papaceno, Industry Alley
Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide (1947) included two versions; so did Gary Regan’s The Joy of Mixology (2003), listing the neglected Straits Sling recipe as “Singapore Sling #1” and offering a second that included triple sec.
“The Singapore Sling is a perfect example of the kind of drinks that came from outside the world of tiki establishments and took up residence on tiki menus everywhere,” wrote San Francisco bar owners Martin and Rebecca Cate in Smuggler’s Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum and the Cult of Tiki (2016). The legendary Trader Vic, they wrote, included it on his first menu under the category, “Drinks I Have Gathered from the Four Corners of the Globe.”
Here’s a typically involved recipe, the one I favored for a while, from The PDT Cocktail Book: The Complete Bartender’s Guide from the Celebrated Speakeasy (2011):
2 oz. pineapple
1 ½ oz gin
½ oz Cherry Heering
½ oz grenadine (I use pomegranate molasses)
¼ oz Cointreau
¼ oz Benedictine
¼ oz lime
Angostura bitters
Shake with ice and strain into a chilled Collins glass filled with ice. Garnish with a cherry and a slice of pineapple.
Straight Sling – Egged on by cocktails writer Martin Douderoff, one of his Pegu Club regulars, Solomon decided to see how he could improve on the drink while keeping its historical accuracy. By early 2006, he’d hit on a Benedictine-less version that used both dry and sweet cherry brandies – kirsch and Cherry Heering. It appeared on the Pegu Club menu later that year as the Solomon Sling.

Pork & Beans opens Downtown

By Celine Roberts

Chefs Richard DeShantz and Keith Fuller’s new venture has a boldly beer-centric drinks program

Richard DeShantz’s trifecta of Downtown restaurants, Meat & Potatoes, Butcher and the Rye and Täkō, has taught Pittsburgh to expect great things from behind the bar. Employing expert staffs, earning a James Beard semifinalist award for Outstanding Bar Program two years running, and creating excellently curated bar menus emphasizing each establishment’s individual character have all been standard procedure. When Keith Fuller, executive chef of the highly respected and creative but now-closed Root 174, and DeShantz, with partner Tolga Sevdik, teamed up for Pork & Beans, the city collectively started counting down. It opened in late October to the anticipation of foodies and drink enthusiasts alike.

The space is inviting, with bright colors and padded pink bar stools. A beer-can mosaic of a pig adorns one wall and a chain-link, barbed-wire-topped fence separates the dining area from the front bar. A few outdoor tables and in-vogue glassed garage doors pleasantly blend the street with the interior, which will be lovely for warmer days and happy hours.

Michael R. Anderson, Pork & Beans’ bar manager, has worked for the company’s other three establishments and intends to bring the same quality and focus to this new venture while keeping it playful. Each restaurant focuses on its own style, and Anderson is intent on Pork & Beans following suit. He pulled in Riley Snyder, formerly of Beerhead, to run the beer program after sitting at his bar and chatting with him after shifts. With 30 beers on draft and about 120 in bottles in formats ranging from 12 to 40 ounces, Pork & Beans has a laser focus on beer. Order a 40 and it’ll give you a brown bag to go with it. The restaurant also offers wine (in cans, too!), cocktails and nitro cold-brew coffee on draft, for a total of 36 taps.

The cocktails a friend and I quaffed all went down nicely, and the menu provides an excellent tableau for every palate. The Tennessee Ninja Mint Julep is an herbal riff on a classic, sweet and satisfying. It’s served in a beans can repurposed from its use in the house pork-and-beans dish. (The beans are made and canned in-house.) The house gin and tonic, the P&B G and T, utilizes a custom artisan tonic from Bittercube.

Since Pork & Beans is focusing on its beer program, I’ll be excited to return for dinner and take advantage of the beautiful wooden cooler-cabinet full of bombers, which are 22 oz. bottles of beer. These are to be ordered for the table, like one might split a bottle of wine. “We wanted to keep the wine list minimal to encourage sharing beer at the table,” says Anderson. If searching for the best of both worlds, order a beer cocktail. The Scotch Cherry was a creamy delight, smoothly blending Cherry Heering and Scotch ale.

A Classic Returns to New York City on wsj.com

By CHARLES PASSY

After a three-year hiatus, the Manhattan Cocktail Classic is returning in the spring of 2017

The event, founded in 2009, became one of the annual highlights of the New York dining and drinking calendar, attracting as many as 8,000 attendees for a series of parties and other events, topped by a boozy gala at the New York Public Library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on Fifth Avenue.

After 2014, the festival, created by spirits-industry professional Lesley Townsend Duval, was sold to another promoter, J.D. Albano, according to Ms. Duval.

A 2015 festival was planned but later canceled. Mr. Albano couldn’t be reached for comment.

Now, a new group of investors and organizers, headed by James Moreland, another spirits-industry veteran, has taken ownership of the event for an undisclosed sum, Mr. Moreland said. The festival is scheduled to return May 12, running until May 18, according to the group.

Mr. Moreland said the new Manhattan Cocktail Classic will continue its partying ways but will add a bigger trade component, connecting spirits brands with bar and restaurant professionals. The budget for the 2017 event will be in the seven figures, Mr. Moreland added, with about 80 to 100 spirits brands represented.

While the festival had long competed with Tales of the Cocktail, a New Orleans event for the bar and spirits industry, Mr. Moreland said he believes it can hold its own because of New York’s importance in the cocktail world.

“This is where all the trends start,” he said.

Art Sutley, publisher of Bar Business Magazine, a New York-based trade journal that has signed on to be a sponsor of the relaunched Manhattan Cocktail Classic, echoed that view.

“We need to have something here,” Mr. Sutley said.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/a-classic-returns-to-new-york-city-1478820446

Drink This: Xocolatl on vegasseven.com

By Xania Woodman

In Las Vegas, Halloween is more of a season than it is a holiday. But our thirst for the resulting themed cocktails usually has a half-life of one sickly-sweet or absurdly festooned novelty drink. Bucking the trend, the recently relocated Nora’s Italian Cuisine found a way around the holiday menu trap with a stirred Manhattan-style drink that we’ll find ourselves reaching for all year long. Xocolatl ($12) brings together chocolate and mezcal, two elements that share a common ancestor. The ancient Aztecs revered both chocolate and pulque, a sacred fermented agave drink that would eventually give rise to distilled agave spirits. If only they had combined them in the same way that mixologist Adam Giles has at Nora’s, where Kimo Sabe Rubedo Reposado Mezcal meets Cherry Heering Liqueur, Lustau East India Solera Sherry, house-made cinnamon- and clove-spiced chocolate syrup and Fee Brothers Aztec Chocolate Bitters, and is served up with a chocolate-infused Luxardo Maraschino Cherry. Kimo Sabe’s father/daughter founders, Jim Walsh and Ashley Walsh Kvamme, made chocolate in Hawaii before embarking on their mezcal journey—sweet serendipity that gives this recipe an even deeper resonance. While boozy and dessert-inspired, it’s a sophisticated treat that will do the trick before dinner or after.

Xocolatl

As served at Nora’s Italian Cuisine, $12

In a mixing glass, combine 2 ounces Kimo Sabe Rubedo Reposado Mezcal, ½ ounce Cherry Heering Liqueur, ¾ Lustau East India Solera Sherry, ½ ounce house-made Lady Godiva Syrup (Godiva Dark Chocolate Liqueur, brown sugar, cinnamon, clove and vanilla bean) and 3 dashes Fee Bros. Aztec Chocolate Bitters. Add ice, still till chilled, strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with a Godiva-infused Luxardo maraschino cherry.

Nora’s Italian Cuisine

5780 W. Flamingo Rd., NorasCuisine.com, Instagram: @NorasCuisine

Rhys Wilson and Peter F Heering workshop in Gothenburg Sweden

A great day in Gothenburg Heering (Peter F Heering) Workshop together with amazing Rhys Wilson Happiness Forgets one of The World’s 50 Best Bars #London, Renbjer & Magnusson at TOSO and of course our lovely H. Joseph Ehrmann Elixir as support, thank you!

Peter F Heering workshop in Kiev Ukraine with Rhys Wilson, Happiness Forgets UK

Thank you Rhys Wilson Happiness Forgets for excellent Heering (Peter F Heering) Workshop, full house at BAROMETER Bar Show in #Kiev #Ukraine today! and thank you H. Joseph Ehrmann Elixir SF for your ground work! #Modern Classic #CherryHeering #cocktails
Мастер-класс Rhys Wilson – бартендера лондонского Happiness Forgets – на Barometer International Bar Show по вишневому ликеру Heering (Peter F Heering), превратился в настоящую мастерскую. Участники пробовали, как сочетается Heering с разными типами крепкого алкоголя (всего было 12 крепких напитков – водка, джин, ром, мескаль, коньяк, варианты текилы, скотча и бурбона). Результат оказался впечатляющим: вишневый ликер либо оттенял, либо полностью менял крепкую основу. И в одних случаях сочетания казались самодостаточными, а в других требовали дополнительных ингредиентов. Но, что важно, не оказалось ни одной провальной пары! И это было похоже на работу художника, ищущего тона и полутона для своих шедевров.
После наглядной демонстрации возможностей Heering, Rhys пригласил участников мастер-класса тут же на месте поэкспериментировать с разными ингредиентами, предложив и молоко, и йогурт, и специи, и фрукты. Не все рискнули «химичить» при маэстро, но с удовольствием смотрели на работу коллег.
Все было круто! Спасибо Rhys Wilson, спасибо Heering, спасибо Barometer и спасибо всем, кто разделили с нами этот опыт!

 

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