Weeknights at Jean-Robert’s Table in Cincinnati

…They also are featuring a Summer cocktail that is one of my favorite cocktails, the St. Germain, with one extra ingredient which sounds perfect;  St. Germain liqueur and Cherry Heering topped with Perrier Jouet,

Exclusive insider’s guide: HRH Queen Elizabeth favourite liqueur – Cherry Heering

 

25. Prince Charles apparently retains a taste for the curious liqueur that got him into hot water at school. Shepherd Neame holds his warrant as “Supplier of Cherry Brandy”. The Prince favours the brand Grant’s Morella while his mother’s warrant goes to Cherry Heering.

Iskaffe basen i sommarens drink, “Ja” enligt Köttbarens bartender Johan Evers

 

Kan sommarens drink vara isversionen av Irish Coffee? Om du frågar Köttbarens bartender Johan Evers är svaret ja. Han har tillsammans med baristan Carl Ahlman från Johan&Nyström skapat “Irish Dew” som baseras bland annat på den irländska whiskeyn Tullamore Dew, Sumatra Gayo-kaffe och Aperol.

Vi träffade en Johan Evers i högform på Fredsgatan 12s terrass.

Se länk för recept

http://nojesguiden.se/artiklar/iskaffe-basen-i-sommarens-drink

 

 

 

tom terrific

1 3/4 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin
1/2 oz Cherry Herring
1/2 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Simple Syrup

Shake with ice and strain into a Collins glass containing ice cubes.  Top with 2-3 oz Great Divide’s Titan IPA, garnish with an orange slice and a cherry, and add a straw.

On Memorial Day after a cookout, I decided to set out on the town to see what was open.  My adventure began at the new Park Restaurant in Harvard Square, and the drink that called out to me was the Tom Terrific.  While bartender Chris Balchum made my drink, I asked bar manager Daren Swisher about the recipe.  I started by asking about the beer choice since I had just heard Daren give a talk on beer along with TJ Curley’s Kevin Mabry at a Boston Bartenders Collaborative meeting.  Daren explained that he wanted a West Coast style of beer, and it originally was Green Flash’s IPA before he switched to Great Divide’s. In addition, the question served as a good avenue to get Daren talking about this riff on the Tom Collins which turned out to be a tribute to Patriot’s quarterback Tom “Terrific” Brady.  The beer choice represented Tom’s home state of California where he grew up.  Since Brady played college football in Michigan, Daren thought of the state’s obsession with the cherry and opted for Cherry Heering liqueur.  The earlier version of the drink included Myer lemon and black strap molasses which were later switched to regular lemon and simple syrup; however, there was no mention if the juice or the garnish somehow related to Brady’s wins in the Citrus and Orange Bowls during college.

The cherry and orange slice garnish contributed greatly to the drink’s aroma along with the IPA’s hops.  On the sip, the beer’s malt and carbonation paired well with the lemon juice.  Next, the liqueur’s cherry and gin’s juniper appeared on the swallow that ended dryly from the hops notes.  Moreover, I was impressed at how well the hops complemented the gin — an observation I first noted when I made a beer-laden French 75 variation for Mixology Monday.

cocktailvirgin.blogspot.se/2012/06/tom-terrific.html

THE BEST HEERING DEAL EVER WITH JDEAL

The best of Heering at 50% off. Coupon gets you $59.98 worth of Heering Cherry and Coffee Liquers for $29.99 (two bottles)                    

The next time you have guests over for Shabbat dinner, forego the decaf with Coffee Rich for something with a little more zing.  With this jdeal, get one bottle each of Heering Cherry and Coffee Liqueurs for only $29.99 (regularly $59.98). Simply download this FREE coupon to redeem at unionsquarewines.com.

Coupon quantities are limited so act fast.

http://www.jdeal.com/?did=9099&affex=CH

Your must-have fashion accessory of the season, Heering Cherry Liqueur adds extravagance and civilization to the mix of some of the most legendary cocktails of all time, including the original Singapore Sling. The original “Cherry Brandy,” it contains only natural ingredients including Danish grown cherries and almonds for a smooth, invigorating flavor.

Coffee Heering is a rare blend of Caribbean rum, dark coffee and rich cocoa. It’s perfect for warm and cold cocktails, but you can also pour it over ice and chill. A splash of Coffee Heering transforms a standard drink into a delicious Coffee Sourz or an aromatic Coffee Latte. Both liqueurs are Kosher certified with the highest ranking, the OU certification.

Buy this jdeal and be your own mixologist. Your guests will agree: Heering Cherry and Coffee Liqueurs are the perfect recipe for great-tasting, creative cocktails.

crossing to calais on Cocktail virgin

crossing to calais

1 3/4 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin
1 oz Bonal Gentiane-Quinquina
1/2 oz Cherry Heering
1 barspoon Combier Triple Sec (Cointreau)

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.  Garnish with a lemon twist.

Two Fridays ago for a nightcap, I made Misty Kalkofen’s Martinez variation that I had found on TastingTable.  The other Martinez variation that Misty proffered was the Armadawhich I had tried at Drink.  Crossing to Calais is perhaps a reference of how the drink is a combination of British and French styled ingredients; Calais is the destination across the English Channel where the Dover ferry lands.

 
The Crossing to Calais presented a lemon oil and Ransom Old Tom Gin’s spice aroma with a hint of cherry from the Heering.  The Cherry Heering’s sweetness combined with the Bonal’s grape on the sip, and the swallow began with the gin’s spice and ended with a dry cherry flavor.  As for a Martinez variation, I could see how Cherry Heering and Bonal combined to simulate sweet vermouth; however, the triple sec seemed to fall short of what Maraschino donates to a Martinez.  Overall, this was a delightful cocktail regardless of its genesis.

http://cocktailvirgin.blogspot.se/2012/06/crossing-to-calais.html

Remember the Maine on Cold-Glass.com

Remember the Maine is built on the Manhattan model, with a delightful, surprising substitution for the bitters: absinthe and Cherry Heering.

Remember the Maine has been around since before Prohibition, and probably since before the 20th Century, but until 1939 it traveled under the name “McKinley’s Delight.” A. S. Crockett includes it in The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book, a 1935 compendium of pre-Prohibition cocktails vetted by the Waldorf’s barmen, but he doesn’t provide specifics of the drink’s origin.  It seems reasonable to speculate that it was a public relations stunt from the 1896 presidential election, something William McKinley’s gold standard partisans could stand up against competitor William Jennings Bryan’s “Free Silver Fizz” — gin, rum, milk and lemon. (There is no evidence that McKinley ever drank a McKinley’s Delight.)

Crockett describes McKinley’s Delight thus:

McKinley’s Delight (Crockett)

  • One dash absinthe
  • Two dashes cherry brandy
  • Two-thirds Whiskey
  • One-third Italian Vermouth (stir)

With that 2:1 mixture of rye whiskey and sweet vermouth, this drink’s unknown inventor clearly subscribed to the Manhattanite school of cocktailing. A bit of whiskey-friendly cherry brandy and a taste of absinthe makes a very imaginative bitters alternative.

Charles H. Baker published the same recipe in 1939 in his popular Gentleman’s Companion, under the name “Remember the Maine.” It seems that his new name won out over time. As the topical and partisan “McKinley’s Delight,” the recipe was rarely published either before or after 1939; as a patriotic memorial of the Spanish-American War era, ”Remember the Maine” became a famous classic.

Making Remember the Maine

There’s one easy trick to making a first-rate Remember the Maine (or McKinley’s Delight): remember the Manhattan.

Specifically, remember to use restraint with the absinthe and Heering—they easily overpower the base flavors of the whiskey and vermouth. Just as excessive bitters will unbalance and ruin a Manhattan, a heavy hand with the Heering and absinthe will will make a terrible muddle of Remember the Maine.

Remember the Maine

  • 3 oz rye whiskey (Rittenhouse 100)
  • ¾ oz sweet vermouth (M&R Rosso)
  • 1 barspoon (⅛ oz) Cherry Heering
  • 1 barspoon (⅛ oz) absinthe (Kübler)
Wash a chilled cocktail glass with absinthe or substitute. Stir the first three ingredients with ice, and strain into absinthe-coated cocktail glass. Optionally, garnish with a lemon twist or brandied cherry.

Whiskey: The original 2:1 recipe provided by Crockett and Baker is too sweet. The vermouth, Heering and absinthe all bring sugars to the mix, so I recommend upping the whiskey to a 4:1 proportion. If you enjoy Manhattans a bit on the sweet side, you may want to try 3:1, or even the original 2:1, in Remember the Maine. This drink is a fine opportunity for a high-proof rye like Rittenhouse 100 or Wild Turkey 101.

Vermouth: I use my standard M&R Rosso, and it works very nicely in this recipe.

Heering and absinthe replace the Manhattan’s bitters. The Heering is an excellent liqueur with good, clean natural flavors, but it is sweet, and has that self-important cherry aggressiveness. The surprise for me is the way Heering combines with absinthe to provide a very complex mix that is neither cherry nor anise. It is a dark, rather earthy combination that reminds me of… chocolate. I’ve read descriptions of Cherry Heering that included a chocolate note; I’ve never been able to taste it, but with the addition of absinthe the chocolate notes really light up—and combine very elegantly with the whiskey and vermouth. The Kübler is a relatively light absinthe, which is likely the key to equal parts working well; you may have to adjust for other absinthes or substitutes.

 

 

scientistmcgee.com “an amateur mixologist’s journey in to the world of spirits…”

Well, I hope everyone had a great Memorial Day holiday weekend.  I sure did!  Today was my first day back to work after a really nice, long 5 day weekend.  I really didn’t make many new cocktails over the holiday weekend however, instead focusing more on drinks best suited for brunches and do-nothing relaxation such as the Bloody Mary and Mimosas.  Now that I’m no longer just lounging around with nowhere to be at any certain time, and back to keeping a schedule, I need drinks better suited for enjoying after a long day of work, unwinding in the evening time.

In this post, I have 3 good cocktails to share with you… two of them, the “Blinker” and the “Xanthia Cocktail”, being very old drinks from books of mine and the 3rd being one of my own creation, named 5 minutes ago after my St. Louis neighborhood – the “Clifton Heights Cocktail”.

“Xanthia Cocktail”

The Xanthia Cocktail is not one of my favorite drinks, but it’s a decent one.  I picked this one out of “The Savoy Cocktail Book”.  The yellow Chartreuse definitely takes center stage in this aromatic drink with a kick.  The cherry brandy and gin hang in the background, blending nicely and both slightly mellowing and propping up the Chartreuse front and center.  If you want a Chartreuse drink, this is it for you.  If you’re not in the mood for a Chartreuse drink, this is not it for you.

1 oz. Cherry Heering

1 oz. yellow Chartreuse

1 oz. dry gin

Shake well with ice, and then strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

(“The Savoy Cocktail Book”)


“Clifton Heights Cocktail”

Last but not least… actually this one’s my favorite of the three.  I’ve been experimenting lately with modifying one of my favorite cocktails, the “Blood & Sand”, by tinkering with its 4 ingredients (1:1:1:1) and switching out different ingredients a couple at a time.

Rather than starting a completely new drink totally from scratch, this tinkering method is a nice, easy and safe foray in to creating my own cocktails.  The “Blood & Sand” is made of equal parts scotch, Cherry Heering, orange juice and sweet vermouth.  In follow-up to my recent reminder of the fact that I love rye and I love grapefruit, surprise…  I worked those two favorite ingredients of mine in to the classic B&S recipe!  I swapped the scotch with rye whiskey and the orange juice with grapefruit, keeping the Cherry Heering and the sweet vermouth.  And it turns out to be a really great drink!  It’s still got the rich, dark sweetness of a Blood & Sand because of the Cherry Heering, but because of having grapefruit instead of orange, it’s not quite as sweet.  It’s less of an “out there” flavor combination than the Blood & Sand, and more of a familiar, common sense flavor mix.  While I love the Blood & Sand because it’s kind of a crazy mixture of unique, vibrant flavors, I like this drink a lot because it’s got some of the same elements while being a really great balance of a smooth, no-nonsense flavor combination.  I’m proud to say that I really like this cocktail.  And since I couldn’t think of a clever name that’s a fun twist on the Blood & Sand moniker, I stuck with just naming the drink I made up, derived from one of my favorite cocktails, after the St. Louis neighborhood I live in and love, Clifton Heights.

Equal parts…

-rye whiskey

-Cherry Heering

-grapefruit juice

-sweet vermouth

Shake well with ice, and then strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.


“Clifton Heights Cocktail”

Last but not least… actually this one’s my favorite of the three. I’ve been experimenting lately with modifying one of my favorite cocktails, the “Blood & Sand”, by tinkering with its 4 ingredients (1:1:1:1) and switching out different ingredients a couple at a time.

Rather than starting a completely new drink totally from scratch, this tinkering method is a nice, easy and safe foray in to creating my own cocktails. The “Blood & Sand” is made of equal parts scotch, Cherry Heering, orange juice and sweet vermouth. In follow-up to my recent reminder of the fact that I love rye and I love grapefruit, surprise…
I worked those two favorite ingredients of mine in to the classic B&S recipe! I swapped the scotch with rye whiskey and the orange juice with grapefruit, keeping the Cherry Heering and the sweet vermouth. And it turns out to be a really great drink! It’s still got the rich, dark sweetness of a Blood & Sand because of the Cherry Heering, but because of having grapefruit instead of orange, it’s not quite as sweet. It’s less of an “out there” flavor combination than the Blood & Sand, and more of a familiar, common sense
flavor mix. While I love the Blood & Sand because it’s kind of a crazy mixture of unique, vibrant flavors, I like this drink a lot because it’s got some of the same elements while being a really great balance of a smooth, no-nonsense flavor combination. I’m proud to say that I really like this cocktail. And since I couldn’t think of a clever name that’s a fun twist on the Blood & Sand moniker, I stuck with just naming the drink I made up, derived from one of my favorite cocktails, after the St. Louis neighborhood I live in and love, Clifton Heights.

Equal parts…

-rye whiskey

-Cherry Heering

-grapefruit juice

-sweet vermouth

Shake well with ice, and then
strain in to a chilled cocktail glass.

Singapore Sling on pinterest.com/pin/159455643027128057/

Singapore Sling (gin, pineapple juice, Cherry Heering, Cointreau, Bénédictine, grenadine).

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