Mark Rothko exhibit at Portland Art Museum inspires cocktail

a Rothko-inspired cocktail called Red on the Rocks, a biting
and bracing variation on the Old Fashioned, devised by executive chef Andrew
Biggs—the recipe for which is below.

Layer 3/4 oz. of Cherry Heering (cherry liqueur) in a rocks glass
Soak 1
cube of sugar in bitters
Muddle sugar, 3 Cara Cara Orange slices and add 1
1/2 oz. Bulleit Bourbon, and 1/2 oz. of Dolin Blanc (vermouth) and ice in mixing
tin
Pour into glass
Float 3/4 oz. of Campari
Garnish with one Amarena
Cherry

“I really wanted the colors to blend and transform, in tribute to Rothko’s
artistic vision,” Biggs explains. It’s a lovely drink (available to everyone for
$12 throughout the Rothko run), especially if you give the bourbon and
Campari—two very strong and distinctive flavors—a chance to mingle. And
after a couple drinks you can mingle with your fellow cultural traveler at one
of the aforementioned events during this citywide soiree
. Cheers, Mr.
Rothko.

Wine-based cocktails turning heads

Hunter Valley winemakers may have raised their eyebrows when local bar manager Jamie Walker(below right) began using their wines in his cocktails, but he says the concept is taking off.

Walker, of Goldfish Hunter Valley, told TheShout the idea of wine-based cocktails came from his experience bartending in fine dining restaurants with cocktail bars attached in his native home of Scotland.

He said he’s lucky to be friendly with lots of local winemakers who drink at the bar, and have been very helpful in giving him their ideas on what they think he should do.

“And sometimes what they think I should try and avoid!”

Walker told TheShout that a few of the Hunter’s “old guard” were at first sceptical of the concept, but many have since come round to the idea.

He said they understand the value of putting younger drinkers, or people who wouldn’t normally drink wine, onto Hunter wines.

Kilted Ambrosia (pictured left): 30ml Johnnie Walker Gold, 30ml Tempus Two Tempranillo, 20ml lemon juice, 15ml fig and black chocolate syrup, 5ml Heering Cherry Liqueur, fresh egg white. Shake and double strain into a flute glass straight up, or a rocks glass over ice, served with shaved dark chocolate garnish.

D.C.’s Restaurants Celebrate The Cherry Blossom Festival

 

 

 

Nightlife Photos: Trenchermen Pop-Up at Logan Square Kitchen

Their upcoming Wicker Park venture, Trenchermen (40 percent bar, 60 percent restaurant—at least according to the seat allocation), is on target for a late March opening in the old Spring space. But brothers and chefs Michael (Blackbird) and Patrick Sheerin (Signature Room at the 95th) aren’t holed up testing recipes under top-secret lockdown until then. By tonight’s end, the Sheerins, along with partners Matt Eisler and Kevin Heisner (the guys behind Bangers & Lace and The Anthem) and beverage director Tona Palomino (WD-50), will have hosted six pop-up dinners—with cocktails pairings, naturally—since Sunday evening at Logan Square Kitchen. The menu features dishes such as aged duck breast with cornbread and yuzu apple sauce; drinks include the Slippery Slope (rye, Cynar, Heering cherry liqueur) and the Para Todo Bien (mezcal, Yellow Chartreuse, pineapple).

Browse our photos from Monday night below. And good news for Valentine’s slackers: Tickets are still available for two of tonight’s seatings, at 5:30 and 9:30 p.m.; $120 gets you a five-course dinner with drink pairings, tax, and tip.

Inside Copenhagen #3: mixologist Gromit Eduardsen on drinking in the Danish capital

Tell us about your invention, the Copenhagen Cocktail.
I wanted to make a modern cocktail with interesting twists that everyone could enjoy. And, I wanted to challenge people’s preconceptions about Cherry Heering liqueur – a drink Queen Victoria enjoyed as an after-dinner tipple. I decided to mix it with Bols Genever, the original form of gin used in cocktails in the 1800s; it’s a little off the radar these days. It’s been served at 1105 since we won; friends in New York, Sydney, London, Tokyo – and, or course, at bars in Copenhagen – serve it, too.

The Copenhagen Cocktail recipe

50ml Bols Genever
20ml Cherry Heering Liqueur
20ml fresh pressed lime juice
20ml sugar syrup (Monin)
1 dash Angostura bitters

Shake with ice, then strain into a martini glass. Carefully add a slice of organic orange peel so that it floats on top of the your cocktail.

The High Life: Blood and Sand on hackmytrip.com

My favorite cocktail, bar none, is the Blood and Sand. I wasn’t reading Eric Felten’s excellent WSJ column, “How’s Your Drink?” quite as religiously in 2008, but he has an excellent rundown of the drink’s history and composition. I’d never heard of the movie that inspired the drink’s name, but I certainly relate to the screenwriter he mentions later on who offered $100 to the bartender to learn what was in one. It’s one of the few cocktails that include scotch, and the combination is one that’s strange but so delicious that I enjoy almost as much as a glass of scotch by itself.

Instead of learning about it years ago as I probably should have, I had my first Blood and Sand last summer while dining at Thomas Keller’s Bouchon in The Venetian at Las Vegas. Not only is the food, service, and decor top notch, but the location can’t be beat. You have to find your way to the elevators by the parking garage and take them up to the higher floors, where it sits in a separate lobby far away from the noise of the casino and shops. There are even gas-lit lamps! It was definitely one of the things that made me want to stay at The Venetian on my next trip to Las Vegas.

Fortunately, it’s not a very difficult cocktail to make …sort of. Just combine scotch, sweet vermouth, Cherry Heering, and blood orange juice in a shaker. If you’re off in the proportions, it may be a little too sweet, but it won’t taste awful. Even cheap scotch will do, and you can increase the proportion to make it stand out more against the sugar. The bigger issue is the Cherry Heering and blood orange juice.

Blood oranges are typically in season around mid-December, but for the life of me I haven’t seen them anywhere. Maybe if I were still living in California, where I can get anything at any time, but not in Seattle. I was at a cooking class that month, and the chef was very disappointed that he couldn’t find any to garnish the salads.

Eric recommends in his article that you don’t use blood orange juice from a carton. First of all, it’s expensive (I paid about $5 for 500 mL at Whole Foods), but sitting on the shelf also removes some of the tartness that you need to counteract the sugar. If you do need to rely on packaged juice, you might want to go with ordinary orange juice, which seems to stay tart longer (but choose a brand like Simply that has fewer off flavors). The packaged blood orange juice was almost pure sweetness.

The Cherry Heering is also something most people aren’t going to have on hand. It’s similar to cherry brandy, so you could probably find a close substitute, but I wouldn’t recommend maraschino syrup. That would be too sweet and without enough alcohol. Remember from when I introduced the Aviation, maraschino syrup and maraschino liqueur are very different. It’s the former that is used to preserve cherries, and you should be able to buy a small bottle by itself without any fruit.

Instead, if you don’t have any Cherry Heering, try to find another sort of brandy. Cherry brandy would do, or cognac, or even Grand Marnier since you’re going to have some orange flavor anyway. I tried making one with Grand Marnier instead of Cherry Heering, and it turned out great. You can still add a maraschino cherry for garnish to get some of that missing flavor.

Eric’s recipe is a winner, so I wouldn’t deviate from it much other than perhaps to increase the amount of scotch as I mentioned above.

•1 1/2 oz scotch
•3/4 oz Cherry Heering (or substitute brandy or Grand Marnier)
•3/4 oz sweet vermouth
•3/4 oz fresh blood orange juice (or normal orange juice)
•Shake well and serve with an orange peel or maraschino cherry

So the next time you want a cocktail, are tired of the usual, and want to try something unique without relying on the strange flavored martinis they’re churning out these days, consider a Blood and Sand. The name is manly, and the scotch backs that up, but it won’t have nearly the bite you would expect.

Hats off to this cocktail onsfgate.com

High Hat Cocktail

Makes 1 serving

  • 1 1/2 ounces straight rye whiskey
  • 1/2 ounce Cherry Heering
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 1 maraschino cherry, for garnish

Instructions: Combine all ingredients, except garnish, in a  cocktail shaker. Add ice, shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Add  the garnish.

My Hat Cocktail

Makes 1 serving

  • 2 ounces straight rye whiskey
  • 1/4 ounce Cherry Heering
  • 1/4 ounce Jagermeister
  • 1 Luxardo or other maraschino cherry, for garnish

Instructions: Combine all ingredients, except garnish, in a  mixing glass. Add ice, stir for 15-20 seconds and strain into a chilled cocktail  glass. Add the garnish.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/01/01/FDUR1B6I0G.DTL#ixzz1uYCTQn1G

Now, though, I was faced with a task that I didn’t relish, so I had to think  quickly.

I developed the My Hat Cocktail. I might not be able to eat it, but in London  next year I’ll certainly drink My Hat.

The cocktail is based on the High Hat Cocktail, a mixture of rye, Cherry  Heering and fresh lemon juice. I’ve merely tinkered with the ratios a little and  switched out the lemon juice for a little Jagermeister.

I’m quite partial to a little Jagermeister. Rye-wise I like the Michter’s  10-year-old in this one if you can find it; the Rittenhouse 100-proof is a fine  bottling, too.

If I see you at a bar, I might just let you buy me one of these babies. I  have a reputation to uphold, you know.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/01/01/FDUR1B6I0G.DTL#ixzz1uYCnHNCg

Now, though, I was faced with a task that I didn’t relish, so I had to think  quickly.

I developed the My Hat Cocktail. I might not be able to eat it, but in London  next year I’ll certainly drink My Hat.

The cocktail is based on the High Hat Cocktail, a mixture of rye, Cherry  Heering and fresh lemon juice. I’ve merely tinkered with the ratios a little and  switched out the lemon juice for a little Jagermeister.

I’m quite partial to a little Jagermeister. Rye-wise I like the Michter’s  10-year-old in this one if you can find it; the Rittenhouse 100-proof is a fine  bottling, too.

If I see you at a bar, I might just let you buy me one of these babies. I  have a reputation to uphold, you know.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/01/01/FDUR1B6I0G.DTL#ixzz1uYCnHNCg

 

SUNDOWN AT GRANADA SPECIALTY COCKTAILS on granadatheater.com

SURFER BLOOD
1.25oz Dewars, Sweet Vermouth, Cherry Heering, Orange Juice, Cherry Bitters

Surprise Her This Year With One Of These Awesome Valentines Cocktails on tmrzoo.com

Cockspur Heat of the Moment

1 1/2 oz Cockspur Fine Rum
3/4 oz Cherry Heering Liqueur
3/4 oz
Kahlua
Stir ingredients in a mixing glass with ice.
Strain into a chilled
cocktail glass.

This weekend’s great craft cocktails on utsandiego.com

THE I.B. SUNSET

At El Take it Easy,

If anyone calls you a mezcal snob at this gastrocantina in North Park, they’re not kidding! You’ve been showing off all night, describing how this agave-plant alcohol fills the lungs like campfire, sighs down the back of the throat. And just when you’re impressing everyone with your extensive spirits knowledge, you order one of El Take It Easy’s off-menu specials: the  I.B. Sunset. It’s a dry drink, made with Reposado mezcal, sweet vermouth, Cherry Heering liqueur, and fresh-squeezed orange juice. “Sweet smokiness in my tummy!” You say, sounding every bit the cocktail connoisseur. Get it with a pork belly taco.

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