The Eclipse on marthastewartflowers.com

The Eclipse

This flavorful tequila-based drink recipe is from mixologist Leo Robitschek.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ounce reposado tequila
  • 3/4 ounce Aperol
  • 3/4 ounce Cherry Heering
  • 3/4 ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Splash of mescal

INSTRUCTIONS

Serves 1

Combine tequila, Aperol, Cherry Heering, and lemon juice in a shaker over ice and shake until well chilled. Strain into a rocks glass over 1 large ice cube and top with a splash of mescal.

Cook’s Note: Aperol is an Italian aperitif made from bitter roots and herbs; Cherry Heering is a Danish cherry-flavored liquor

Bombay Sapphire Sloe Gin Cocktails a Festive Treat on gintime.com

Bombay Sapphire Sloe Gin Cocktails a Festive Treat

Sloe Gin, with its ruby red colour, is particularly festive and here are some great ideas from Bombay Sapphire for delicious sloe gin drinks. If you haven’t already made your sloe gin with Bombay Sapphire we strongly recommend Plymouth Sloe gin.

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE SLOE COBBLER
Shake 35ml Bombay Sapphire Sloe Gin, 20ml Amontillado Sherry, 20ml freshly squeezed lemon juice and 10ml Cherry Herring (cherry liqueur) in a cocktail shaker with cubed ice, then pour into a highball glass. Top with crushed ice and garnish with seasonal fruit, a mint sprig, lemon zest and a slice of orange. A perfectly balanced tipple incorporating sweet and dry notes, with a rich nutty sourness
and an elegant sweetness.

http://www.gintime.com/news/bombay-sapphire-sloe-gin-cocktails-a-festive-treat/

Linnea Johansson presents Coffee Heering on TV4

Linneas Boozy Donuts

 

http://www.tv4play.se/nyheter_och_debatt/nyhetsmorgon?title=festfixarens_boozy_donuts&videoid=2123517

 

Happy National Maple Syrup Day on examiner.com

If you love the rich taste of maple syrup, you’re in luck. December 17th is National Maple Syrup Day.  Sweeet!    While the origins of this annual food holiday are unknown, maple syrup has been enjoyed since Native American’s “invented” the syrup centuries ago.   

The Cherry Maple Leaf

The rich, velvety color of this cocktail is reminiscent of fall foliage, while its warming base of brandy and maple wards off autumn’s chill.

MAKES ONE COCKTAIL

 INGREDIENTS

1 oz. brandy

1/2 oz. Cherry Heering
1/4 oz. maple syrup
1/4 oz. dry vermouth
Squeeze of lemon juice

INSTRUCTIONS

Mix the ingredients in a cocktail shaker and pour over ice into a tumbler to serve. 

http://www.examiner.com/holidays-in-national/happy-national-maple-syrup-day-20-maple-syrup-cocktails-beverages

Bar of the Week Double Review: 1534 and Mary Queen of Scots

….Tartan embellishments are countered with spray paint; golden flowers grow out of booths and a cage separates the diners in back from bar guests ordering Scotch-laden cocktails like the classic Blood and Sand (Glenlivet 12 yr, sweet vermouth, Cherry Heering, orange juice and a flamed orange peel). ….

http://www.papermag.com/2010/11/bar_of_the_week_double_review.php

Cherries Flambé on ahistoryofdrinking.com

  Cherries Flambé

 Created by James Moreland 

  • 1 ¼ oz Frangelico
  • 2 barspoons Harvest Song sour cherry macerate
  • ¾ oz Cherry Heering

Shake hard, strain long over rocks. Served in a Collins glass. Garnish with sour cherries and twist of lemon.

Cherry Heering on post-gazette.com living/restaurants

…..

The sun may go down before 5, but at least happy hour starts around the same time. A cocktail or two will warm you right up, like the winter sangria at Eleven, a potent mix of cabernet sauvignon, Cherry Heering, apricot Brandy, cranberry, maple whisky liqueur and fresh fruit. At Salt of the Earth in Garfield, bar manager Summer Voelker is putting the finishing touches on juniper eggnog with Stregga and bourbon, while sister restaurants Brix on the North side and Toast! Kitchen and Wine Bar in Shadyside are serving up mulled wine. A fine glass of liquor feels warming all on its own, and you could spend all winter working your way through the whiskey offerings at Piper’s Pub on the South Side, or the tequila list at the new Verde Mexican Kitchen and Cantina in Friendship.

Wherever you go this season, sit and sip awhile and enjoy the feeling of being cozy and well-fed. You may even find yourself wishing that winter would never end.

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11335/1193631-46.stm

Danish capital´s a heady cocktail of drinking dens, Copenhagen´s own

NEW YORK — Bookended by the Carlsberg and Tuborg breweries, the Danes have long been a nation of beer drinkers. But a new generation of bartenders is driving a vibrant cocktail culture in Copenhagen.

And as of two years ago, the city has its own signature quaff, the Copenhagen Cocktail.

Created by Gromit Eduardsen, bartending partner at 1105 (www.1105.dk), the drink has a cheery pink hue and lightly fruity flavour and won a contest sponsored by Danish liqueur brand Cherry Heering.

However, don’t expect to find the drink on every cocktail menu in town.

At Ruby (http://rby.dk/), offerings run to classics and seasonal libations with international influence, such as the Mirabellini (hazelnut-infused pisco shaken with Mirabelle plum jam and topped with dry Champagne).

Hidden speakeasy The Union (Store Strandstrde 19; 1255 Kbenhavn K) is also noted for its excellent drinks, which flow from midnight until the wee hours — but don’t look for the Copenhagen Cocktail there either.

You can however get one at Mash (www.mashsteak.dk/), short for “Modern American Steak House,” a prime venue for business lunches and dinners. “It has a great bar team,” Eduardsen says, “and it’s probably the best steak house in Scandinavia.”

Among Eduardsen’s rather lengthy list of other must-drink spots: The streamlined Oak Room (www.oakroom.dk/) in the Nrrobro “Latin Quarter” district, “seductive 1800s-style cocktails” at Salon 39 (www.salon39.dk/) in Frederiksberg, and pretty much any of the myriad new bars opening at a fast clip in the hip meat-packing district known as Kdbyen (the name translates as “Meat City”).

For work-hard/play-hard types, Copenhagen “rocks all night long,” says Eduardsen, pointing to Simon’s Copenhagen (http://simonscopenhagen.com/index.html) as a great example; the late-night dance spot is housed in an old art gallery. Not a bad way to get your Copenhagen Cocktail on.

Copenhagen Cocktail

50 ml Genever

20 ml Cherry Heering

20 ml fresh lime juice

20 ml Sirop de gomme (sugar syrup)

Dash of Angostura bitters

Shake over ice. Strain into chilled cocktail coupe. Garnish with an orange twist.

Watch Eduardsen make his award-winning cocktail (www.youtube.com/watch?v-wGPNtAfh64U )

http://www.theprovince.com/travel/Danish+capital+heady+cocktail+drinking+dens/5735225/story.html

Wilde Heart on Tempered Spirits.com

Last month, Imbibe ran a piece on Irish Whiskey that caught my attention, namely because I hadn’t tasted or mixed with very many Irish whiskeys. If you’ve paged through a large number of cocktail books, you’ll understand why — it’s just not used in cocktails very often. According to Imbibe the scene is changing, however, and more and more bartenders are experimenting with what was once the most popular spirit in the country.

As a result of the aforementioned article and a visit to the faux-Irish bar at the New York, New York Hotel in Las Vegas, the Hutch in the basement now has three Irish whiskeys added to its stockpile: Tullamore Dew (decent and mild), Bushmill’s Black Bush (a wonderful blend, a bit maltier, with a hint of sherry), and Redbreast 12-year (a great all-around single-malt). The one that’s been used most frequently as of late is the Black Bush, which is specifically called for in the following drink, the Wilde Heart.

Wilde Heart

1 1/2 ounces Bushmill’s Black Bush Irish Whiskey
3/4 ounce Amaro CioCiaro
1/4 ounce Cherry Heering

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

The Wilde Heart comes from Brandon Josie of 15 Romolo in San Francisco and is a wonderful mix of grain, bitterness, and sweetness. Despite its name, the drink is a gentle one, the CioCiaro being one of the less powerful Italian amari out there but quite a tasty one (I picked it up after seeing it poured into the Southern Cola at Holeman & Finch). What I love here is the use of Cherry Heering: it normally provides a powerful wallop of flavor that, while wonderful, tends to take over drinks. Plus, I rarely use it in anything except the Blood & Sand and the Singapore Sling*. In the Wilde Heart, it adds just enough fruity oomph to highlight the sherry-cask flavor of the Black Bush and the slight notes of fruit in the amaro. The hint of citrus oil from the orange twist completes the package. Says the 15 Romolo bar menu: “As dark and flamboyant as the author namesake.”

On the Wilde Heart: ”The subtle depths of sherry cask-finished Black Bush whiskey is matched with the nutty richness of an Italian amaro, with cherry liqueur lending a plush sweetness.”

Bushmills Black Bush: “Aged in used sherry casks, Bushmills Black Bush is rich and luscious, with an aroma of almonds and cherries and a bold flavor touched with dried fruit and honey.”

Redbreast: “Made with a combination of malted and unmalted barley, the single pot-still whiskeys from Redbreast are some of the best spirits coming out of Ireland. Redbreast 12-year-old is bold, with notes of honey, orange zest, and hazelnuts…”

Imbibe, September/October 2011

If you’re a Manhattan drinker, give the Wilde Heart (or the Redbreast whiskey) a try and I think you’ll have a new drink for the Fall. For a few more classic Irish whiskey drinks, head over to 12 Bottle Bar’s drink menu and sift through their selection.

*PS: I couldn’t find the Original Singapore Sling recipe listed online, but Ted Haigh published it in “How the Sling was Slung” in Imbibe July/August 2011. The recipe follows:

Original Singapore Sling

1 ounce London Dry Gin
1 ounce Bols Cherry Brandy or Cherry Heering
1 ounce Bénédictine
1 ounce Fresh Lime Juice

2 ounces Soda Water
1 dash Angostura Bitters

Combine all ingredients except soda water and bitters in an ice-filled Collins glass. Top with soda, then dash the bitters on top. Garnish with either a thick lime spiral (a la the 1920s) or omit the Bénédictine and bitters and float sloe gin on top (a la the 1930s).

For a newer version, check out Robert Hess’s show, but I like the original version best; Beachbum Berry’s Singapore Sling (? – 1950s), from Beachbum Berry Remixed, is also very good (up the gin to two ounces, reduce the Bénédictine to 1/2 ounce, add 1/2 ounce of brandy and omit the bitters, though they wouldn’t do any harm).

Wildest Redhead on tastingtable.com

Red-haired Meaghan Dorman, who presides over the cocktails at this Iroquois hotel lair, was insulted that the Wild Redhead, a lemon juice-Cherry Heering cocktail featured in the circa-1970s Jones Complete Bar Guide, didn’t reflect its sassy moniker. Dorman amplified the drink, creating this spicier, boozier version that lives up to her brazen expectations.

Wild Redhead – Make It At Home

Ice
¾ ounce fresh lemon juice
½ ounce honey
¼ ounce St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram
1½ ounces blended Scotch
¼ ounce Cherry Heering

In a cocktail shaker filled with ice, combine the lemon juice, honey, dram and Scotch and shake vigorously. Drizzle the Cherry Heering over ice (ideally one large cube) in a rocks glass and then strain the cocktail into the glass. Serve.

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